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So I'm in the process of switching my UMO print head to an E3D V6 and the filament size has also switched from 3mm to 1.75 mm.

I'm currently still using the UMO aluminum heater block, as it's compatible with the E3D hot end, however I have future plans of switching the printer from 19v to 24v and I wanted to also replace the stock parts with the ones provided by E3D and use a PT100 temperature sensor.

Anyone has any recommendations on how to have this working with an UMO? (not UMO+)

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Hey tommy, thanks for your reply.

What about the Rumba: was it an improvement over the UMO electronics in your opinion?

 

I think it was yes...

I had started a project of adding a heated bed to the printer and was planning to use a common reprap heatbed and the widely adopted route (at least at the time) of using a relay between the heatbed and an external PSU, opened and closed with the heatbed mosfet on the UMO board...

I found the whole setup kind of clunky though, and adding to that almost all other 3d printer parts commonly found on various reprap websites, ebay, etc. are either 12 or 24V... not 19v as is the UMO standard.

Finally the RUMBA board itself is pretty nifty with several different options for plugging in components, additional slots for stepper drivers, heaters and temp sensors and once I got started the conversion went pretty smoothly... Never did get my UltiController to work with the Rumba though, so I replaced that with a 10 euro SmartController from ebay.

Edited by Guest

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I've tweaked the current UMO electronics to run at 24V by replacing the LM7812 with a DC-DC converter. I now wonder how far I can push those. Trying to limit my expenses. A hot bed upgrade is on the horizon, but not my immediate requirement (still printing pla) :)

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I've tweaked the current UMO electronics to run at 24V by replacing the LM7812 with a DC-DC converter. I now wonder how far I can push those. Trying to limit my expenses. A hot bed upgrade is on the horizon, but not my immediate requirement (still printing pla) :)

 

See this is probably where I would start thinking long term... My impression back when I did my research was that you would have various problems running a heatbed through the UMO board, so eventually you would end up with either the relay solution , or swapping the electronics at that point.... But that's just me, and I do understand the limiting od expenses part... The RUMBA board is not cheap.

Anyways, this went off track, post was supposed to be about pt100 and E3D

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