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kmanstudios

Rubbing of nozzle on infill above a certain height

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Edit: Should have been in Troubleshooting section...Please move Mods..sorry, do not know why I did this.

I am not sure if this is a hardware issue or software issue.

But I noticed on my last model or so I printed at significant height, that the nozzle started to drag across the infill with a noise. It seems to only happen when the model is above a certain height. I have not quantified that height. And, the infill was 25% with triangles to make it sturdy. May be why I do not notice it other times as I usually use a gradual infill of some time for time's sake and the lack of need to have a super strong model.

Or, I could just be imagining things. But what would make that happen? Note that the printer has been running for more than 2,000 hours since January. I see no slippage across the X or Y (No shifting) and I do not see any change in layering as the model is printed upwards.

Print quality is good in all other areas not affected by the clumsy noob (moi). And, maybe environmental issues can cause this? But, it did knock a piece off on my last major print: 6 days and just over 10 Inches tall and almost a spool of material. Dangit!! I like that material!! LOL

Edit: Usually using active leveling between buildplate swaps between prints. But, as I said, does not seem to happen until it reaches above a certain height.

Cura 2.5 and mostly default settings (Usually only changing support density, choosing infill type, etc)

Edited by Guest

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I think kmanstudios have it explained, there are other issues as well. Slight over extrusion cause buildup of material here and there. When object structure changes, the slicer could decide that another direction of the nozzle is better and it will meet the excess material. Also the effect of cooling and curling are emphasized by the gradual cooling of material. When the nozzle then pushes on the now slightly expanded material, the build plate tends to be pushed down a slightly bit while the nozzle lays the material. But when the nozzle moves when not printing, the build plate are back up and combined with expanded material sooner or later the force holding the object down will give in.

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I think kmanstudios have it explained, there are other issues as well. Slight over extrusion cause buildup of material here and there. When object structure changes, the slicer could decide that another direction of the nozzle is better and it will meet the excess material. Also the effect of cooling and curling are emphasized by the gradual cooling of material. When the nozzle then pushes on the now slightly expanded material, the build plate tends to be pushed down a slightly bit while the nozzle lays the material. But when the nozzle moves when not printing, the build plate are back up and combined with expanded material sooner or later the force holding the object down will give in.

 

I had not considered any over-extrusion. The layers look nice and even, no shortage or gaps, or blobs. Ooze shield is doing its job quite well. Not stringy at all.

But as a follow up, I did close the doors last night and my new print does not have the effect. And, what tipped me off was this was a short model started as the day was closing and cooling. Usually, it only happened after a long time and considerable height. Rats! Was enjoying the cooler fresh air, especially after having everything closed up for a little more than a week printing with PC...it got hot in here! I do have bubble wrap taped over the opening to keep in the heat, but a lot must be getting out the top.

Our weather is really all over the map too. Not even getting to 60°F here in NYC today. A lot of humidity, but only a PLA on PLA print.

But, equalizing the temp did help. No bumping or knocking into parts.

Edited by Guest

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