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How to get rid of short extra shell sections in Cura

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Hi all,

I'm trying to figure out how to get rid of the short sections of shell that Cura generates extra on each layer. They are yellow in the attached screenshot. They generate extra useless moves & ooze strings inside my infill. As I am printing with exposed infill as a feature (no bottom layers) I would like to get rid of these.

Are these generated under angled surfaces in order to support the higher layer shell? In Slic3r there's a feature like that which creates extra areas of solid infill but these are reduced if you add extra shells. In Cura adding extra shells doesn't remove the short extra shell sections.

5a333d0a31be9_Schermafbeelding2017-07-20om11_36_37.thumb.png.222b247ebdabc945a432a0b53dd24157.png

5a333d0a31be9_Schermafbeelding2017-07-20om11_36_37.thumb.png.222b247ebdabc945a432a0b53dd24157.png

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Thanks IRobertI, that solved 95% of it indeed. This model allows for it and I'll play with it more next time. Some of it is still in the top layers, even with 0 top layers, not problematic there but will look a bit deeper.

5a333d0befd90_Schermafbeelding2017-07-20om15_16_58.thumb.png.88e0408deba201b40fbe6cd4ccb60aeb.png

What is the color code of lines in Cura?

red = outer shell

green = extra inside shells

orange = infill

thin blue = non printing move

yellow = ?

IIRC this is because those areas are being treated as a top surface and cura is trying to meet the top thickness criteria by adding more infill. So if the model allows it, reduce the top thickness and it will remove those extra lines.

Edited by Guest

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