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Bossler

Nylon (Taulmann 910 Alloy)

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I did a bigger print with Taulmann Alloy 910.

 

First:

Print went surprisingly well without warping issues with the front cover in place and 3DLac as adhesive on the glass plate.

No stringing issues as well.

 

IMG_4281.thumb.JPG.adda2d40a7a693611fb7f3a73ad79370.JPG

(ignore the benchy, it's included just for size comparison;-)

 

To be solved issue:

The final print turned out to be not water tight!

So when I filled the bucket with water, it started to drop out and to fill even the walls...:-(

 

Looks like the stuff is not really bonding to well to itself, right?

While the print seems to be quite stable. Hm.

 

I did print this at 255°C which is already at the upper limit of the recommended temp. range.

 

Also I did dry the filament for 8hrs in an oven right before the print (at 75°C) and the filament was in a
polybox during print.

 

Any ideas, why this stuff does seem to not bind well enough to itself?

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I can honestly say that I have never had any print with any filament be watertight when printed. Water is a very invasive thing and can get into any crevice. The suggested method is to get a bio-safe sealant like an epoxy that can be brushed or sprayed on to create a watertight seal against anything on the inside.

 

That is one of the reasons I let my prints dry, at varying degrees of tilt, for several days before painting and trapping any moisture inside the walls or infills.

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Well, i made some valve-blocks, which were driven with pressurized air up to 5 bar. Only one was not air-tight. The first attempts were printed at 100% infill, later versions at 50% with 3mm walls. I cut threads (~10mm) and sanded the sealing faces with wet sand paper. It all worked. And it was PLA. (But i have to admit, the last cases with ABS/ASA were cracky..)

Oh, and there was a vase, printed by someone at 3D-Hubs with Colorfabb XT on a UM2 with very thin walls (0,5mm) - no water on the table!

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I have printed other things which are water tight already (okay, not on the UM3 but on the R3D N2).

As you, dxp, I have used PLA back then.

 

I wonder what I can change with the Nylon to get a better layer adhesion.

Printing even slower? Hm.

Edited by Bossler
typo

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