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ian

first question, what is 5D ??

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5D means that there is an "E" and "F" axis. The old-school machines used M10x codes to start & stop the flow, and it was really problematic to get the right speed when speeding up and slowing down. This was solved with 5D, where they added the "E" and "F" axis, to achieve high speeds.

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5D means that there is an "E" and "F" axis. The old-school machines used M10x codes to start & stop the flow, and it was really problematic to get the right speed when speeding up and slowing down. This was solved with 5D, where they added the "E" and "F" axis, to achieve high speeds.

...and E is 'extrusion' and F is X/Y speed.

Basically, 5D allowed movement of all axes (x, y, z, f, and e) on each line of gcode. With that, it's a LOT easier for the firmware to play games with speeding things up and slowing them down so we can have features like acceleration.

Volumetric 5D came later and redefined what E meant. It used to be (straight 5D) the length of filament you wanted to come out of the nozzle and changed to mean the length of filament going into the extruder drive. This made it WAAAAAY easier to come up with new printing profiles, since it allowed slicers to just say "I want this much filament" and not have to worry about nozzle size and temperature and all that crap that can vary from machine to machine..

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Volumetric 5D came later and redefined what E meant. It used to be (straight 5D) the length of filament you wanted to come out of the nozzle and changed to mean the length of filament going into the extruder drive. This made it WAAAAAY easier to come up with new printing profiles, since it allowed slicers to just say "I want this much filament" and not have to worry about nozzle size and temperature and all that crap that can vary from machine to machine..

Maybe even more important, it makes slight variations in nozzle size unimportant.

Still, IMHO, the current implementation is still not the best. Because if you change filament now, you need to slice again. The filament diameter could have been a firmware setting, and the E value could have been a volume.

But it works, and works very well :)

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