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Adaptive Infill / Hyperbolic Tesselation

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Hi all,

I've been printing quite allot of largish (30 - 40) hour builds for use in education.

Infill seems to be eating quite allot of time/material in the build process.

Is there a method to create a more adaptive infill? At the moment I've experimented with using Maya to generate a series of gradually enlarging cells (dense at surface, less so at core), and this helps a bit but is horribly laborious.

Currently for very large objects I'm printing them hollow and manually adding internal buttressing/columns to support overhangs/ceilings and limiting warping (again this is partially via a script in maya).

Any thoughts on generating infill with http://www.plunk.org/~hatch/HyperbolicTesselations/ as I dimly remember them being discussed on a reprap forum several years ago for very similar reasons?

Although generating something like this, especially for a gribbly object, may well increase slice time quite dramatically if overall print time/material use is reduced then it might be worthwhile?

 

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