Jump to content

michaelvk

Member
  • Content Count

    20
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

5 Neutral

1 Follower

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Man, that's AWSOME!!!! How have you managed to get the parts modeled? I´m looking since month/years for minigun or gatling plans to make a 3D model, but without success... Sorry about the late reply, it's been a while since I've been here.. I may have mentioned it before, but the model was found on 3D Warehouse, made by user thespoonkiller. The model isn't 3D printable and able to function out of the box, as the parts need tweaking for tolerances, but otherwise it's all there: https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/user.html?id=0015491875973132162600283&nav=models
  2. I print everything at low speed and low temperature. Say inner wall at around 40 and outer at 18. Temperature is usually around 186 degrees and the bed set to 60. Layer adhesion seems fine, but these are small parts and fragile anyway. The only place where layer adhesion was a problem is with the barrels, where I set the infill too low.
  3. Thank you! I put it on instagram and twitter ages ago, but was persuaded to share it with the community here.. The thing is meant to be a stand alone model which will eventually be perched on it's pintle mount as found on a Chinook or Blackhawk door mount. Here's a video of the bolt and delinker turning together..
  4. Thank you! 0.25 nozzle using Faberdashery Robot silver at around 186 degrees.
  5. A few months ago I upgraded my Ultimaker 2 with the Olsson block, allowing me to produce finer detail with the .25mm nozzle. As a test project I decided to do a 1/4 scale minigun. I found one on 3D Warehouse (model therefor courtesy of a chap that goes by the name of Spoonkiller, link here: https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/user.html?id=0015491875973132162600283 ).. The model however needs a fair amount of work to make it printable.. The material I'm using is Faberdashery's robot silver PLA. Anyway, the work so far: The main housing: The clutch and delinker sprocket: The rotor, with lightening holes as found on the titanium version.. This is the part that really started to pose some printing challenges.. That is until I started on the bolts and their guides: Bolt guide clamp.. I had to print these, as well as the bolts and feed chute links, on a web with five others: Printing the tiny parts separately would've resulted in less than optimal prints, parts falling over, too much heat concentrated on a small area.. So I added 0.3mm webs between the parts to keep the head moving and allow for the parts to keep cool and stable during printing.. I used the same principle for the bolts.. When rotated, the bolts follow the bolt track in the housing.. They're also installed like the real thing. Firing position.. Retracted position.. Stay tuned for more!
  6. There it is! Thanks! (After over two years of using this thing you'd think I'd have learned by now..) What threw me is that it didn't give the same issue in any of the other machine settings..
  7. Here's a weird thing. I loaded a part into Cura 2.1.2 and it auto scaled it to 85%. The strange thing is that the part was only 65mm tall. I only noticed it was auto scaling (I've since turned that off) when I found the part to be a lot smaller than I thought it should be. I then scaled the part back to 100% (101 to compensate for shrinkage), and it then refused to slice. I double checked the part for hidden mesh, but there wasn't any. I then changed the machine from Ultimaker 2 regular to Extended and it was suddenly fine. Having had a look in Cura 2.1.2 now, scaling an object, it appears the Ultimaker 2 machine settings don't support any object taller than 50mm.. I checked to see what would happen if I used 2+ settings and it seemed fine then. Is there anywhere I can amend this?
  8. Weirdly my machine yanked the foam clean out of its casing and it's now in the bottom of the feed unit.. An internal dust filter, so to speak.. I may need to fish that out again, I think..
  9. I arrived at work this morning to find a nice and tightly wound up spool of filament on one end, a 1/4 finished print on the other and a ground up bit in the middle.. Needless to say I was a bit miffed. This is in my opinion the only serious flaw in the standard UM2 setup. I'll be taking these tips to heart, as well as trimming the material to the appropriate length, plus 80cm, for any print I can't stick around long enough to babysit. On the plus side, I think the few hours(?) of stress free turning may have actually done the filament feed some good.
  10. Thanks! Although sadly, as it's for a TV show, you'll have to wait until April/May next year to see what it is..
  11. Actually the 'windswept' look was on that corner, as well as the corner diagonally on the other side, so fan or no fan, it was the same on both sides. Either way, dropping the temperature 5 degrees helped a lot.
  12. Easy does it was the key ultimately. Just lowering the temperature cleared it up immediately. I'm sure I'll end up ruining the print in some novel way down the line though
  13. It appears I answered my own question.. Temperature was a fraction too high.
  14. So here's an interesting one.. I'm printing a sword pommel for this gig I'm working on, and for some reason, on diametrically opposing corners, I'm getting this weird windswept (like ice in The day after tomorrow) effect on trailing edges. I figured it's a form of stringing, but can't understand why it only does it on those two corners.. It's by no means lost (the underlaying profile is intact, so there's no deformation), as it can be scraped/sanded back, but it still puzzles me. I'm using Ultimaker's own (I've got some Colorfabb, but find UM PLA to be crisper in detail) PLA, currently printing at 20% speed and have dropped the temp from 200 to 195 degrees. Any ideas, chaps?
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!