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SandervG

Ulti-Evening October 19th

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The next Ulti-Evening is coming up, with yet another educational and interactive theme.

But this time, hosted by our very own Chris & Layla from our technical support team.

What is it about? Post processing!

It will be two workshops merged into one;

- Vapor treating; making your prints shiny and dissolve layers while keeping most of the details.

Even though I think we should appreciate 3D printing for what it is, and not try to replicate already existing manufacturing methods sometimes you don't need those layers.

- Water Marbling; adding colour to your prints using water, paint and a bucket.

We'll bring equipment that will allow you to try both techniques yourself, but we would like to ask to bring your own prints to experiment on. If you want to try the Vapor treating bring an ABS print with a maximum size of 75mm.

Date: 19-10-2015

Time: 17.00 - 22.00

Locatie: Protospace, Utrecht

17.00 - 18.00 Arrival (Bring your Ultimaker and prints!) and order food (10 euro pp)

18.30 - 19.00 Presentation

19.00 - 22.00 Post processing-time!

Edited by Guest
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I was surprised by the quality off the result of the ABS acetone vapor! I doesn't show that well in the picture but irl I find it looks really good... also had another rough (0.2mm) print that also turned out really good.

AcetoneVaporABS.thumb.jpg.770b5c2fa63c44a9e00913ba3a64d532.jpg

Only still wonder how dangerous it can be to hang an electrical fan (sparks?) in the acetone vapor like Layla did?

AcetoneVaporABS.thumb.jpg.770b5c2fa63c44a9e00913ba3a64d532.jpg

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I'm not sure if she has researched that, but I think it's always good to cover the wires to protect them from the vapours.

Btw, the documentation is already online! You can read the vapor treating tutorial here.

During the Ulti-evening we also discussed water marbling, but since we're still exploring this we don't have a guide yet. This might come later on when we have some more experience :)

But if someone would like to try it, you can basically follow the steps below the create something like this:

IMG_3582.thumb.JPG.d7d394396a46d11e837476c2c20cfecf.JPG

 

  1. Fill a bucket with water and shake the spray cans for at least 2 minutes
  2. Put on your gloves and spray the colors after each other in the water for at least 3 seconds per color
  3. Marble the water with a skewer or pencil when the paint is still liquid
  4. Gently push your print through the layers of paint
  5. Allow the paint to set under water for at least 1 minute
  6. Clear away all the paint that is floating on the water
  7. Take the print out of the water and let it air dry for at least 1 minute before setting it to dry completely (2 hours)

 

IMG_3582.thumb.JPG.d7d394396a46d11e837476c2c20cfecf.JPG

Edited by Guest
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