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neo-ninja

I2K Issues?

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Hi Guys,

Recently needed some new teflon so ordered the new type of teflon coupler and a I2K chip.

Since using the I2K chip i have had lots of under extrusion issues, not enough for prints to be super weak, but enough that the first layer doesn't go down very well and the inside fill being very weak.

What have I done wrong?

Let me know

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My guess is that the nozzle block is now touching the fan shroud somewhere and the nozzle is cooler than desired so it's like you are printing 20C cooler.

Also did you re-level? Each time you change the nozzle it is at a slightly new height.

Can you post a picture of your print head taken from the front that shows the spring and teflon part?

Do you have the Olsson block also?

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I releveled a few times. No Olsson block. I will take a pic.

I followed the instructions on 3dsolex which as far as i could tell, was to screw the steel all the way down then back up half a turn so its sort of a bit loose. By doing that i then dont have any control over the distance to the shroud do i?

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Maybe I am wrong and it's not touching. With the i2k chip in there the spring is tighter and so now there is a LOT more pressure on the white teflon part.

You want the pressure on the white teflon part as small as possible without touching the fan shroud. Since you *don't* have the olsson block you have the smaller original block and so you have more space to deal with and the nozzle can be much lower:

mind_the_gap2.thumb.png.4d3d0b91f1e8cc52c7a4f28529ac661d.png

mind_the_gap2.thumb.png.4d3d0b91f1e8cc52c7a4f28529ac661d.png

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You can rotate the steel coupler without removing anything else - I recommend removing just the front left very-long thumb screw so you have better access to the steel nut coupler. Then heat the nozzle to 150C and then use a hex wrench or other thin metal stick to rotate the steel coupler such that the nozzle goes down (counter clockwise from above). But not so much that it touches the fan shroud - use a bright light and peer through the cracks or let it hang loose and repeatedly put it on and off and feel where the metal shroud touches the block.

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