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Nikolai55

Curling Corners and Slic3r

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Hey guys! I am new to this forum and to the 3d printing world. I have a Flashforge Creator Pro that I am trying to get to print accurately ( I hope it is OK to ask about this printer on this site). I have been using Replicator G instead of Slic3r and Pronterface which I use on two other printers. I would rather use Slic3r because it seems like replicator does not have the same capabilities for changing detailed settings that Slic3r does. The main problem is that Slic3r is not working with this printer, the printer continuously prints farther away from the plate then I specified so the print does not stick, and it is only printing in the back right corner. One thing that I almost forgot to mention is that I was using Slic3r with Replicator G, are there any other good programs that could take the place of the latter in this case?

Also no matter which program I print with the corners curl up, will a skirt and brim fix this? I print with ABS from Hatchbox.

All answers will be greatly appreciated !

-Nik

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Not having an ultimaker is fine but also not using cura - well now your question doesn't belong here. But anyway - ABS curls because the layers above are pulling very hard on the layers below. There are lots of great solutions that work extremely well. They all take some learning.

Are you using painters tape? Or glass. Heated bed or cold? Some kind of PVA glue? (most common pva glues are hairspray, glue stick, wood glue) Or ABS juice (acetone mixed with ABS - another kind of glue)?

Also you can always go with a "raft" which is the older technology and works okay but leaves an ugly bottom to your print.

Also it's important that the bottom layer is squished will into the bed - so you might need to turn the screws on your bed a bit to get it closer to the nozzle.

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Not having an ultimaker is fine but also not using cura - well now your question doesn't belong here.  But anyway - ABS curls because the layers above are pulling very hard on the layers below.  There are lots of great solutions that work extremely well.  They all take some learning.

Are you using painters tape?  Or glass.  Heated bed or cold?  Some kind of PVA glue?  (most common pva glues are hairspray, glue stick, wood glue)  Or ABS juice (acetone mixed with ABS - another kind of glue)?

Also you can always go with a "raft" which is the older technology and works okay but leaves an ugly bottom to your print.

Also it's important that the bottom layer is squished will into the bed - so you might need to turn the screws on your bed a bit to get it closer to the nozzle.

 

Well the bed is heated, I have it set to 110C and the only way that it will get past the first two layers at all is with a raft. I am using I think it is called Kapton tape on the bed as well.

Also this is curling up far more than a shrinking part, my makergear has parts curl but not like this, it seems like there is more filament on the vertical edges than the rest of the part on this one. Is this maybe that the printer settings are wrong?

You mentioned "cura", what is that? As I said I am really new so thank you for your patience!

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Cura is a slicer. It's completely open source but all the primary authors work for Ultimaker now.

Okay - kapton tape. But if you have glass then glass is better. anyway now you need to read about "abs glue". Go read about it. also like I said - make sure the bottom layer is squished into the tape. 110C is great - dont' change that. Do you have the wooden printer or the enclosed one?

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