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Timmiegun

3d Modelling software

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If you are just getting started I would probably recommend to have a look at tinkercad, 3Dslash and Morphi. Those are all super accessible tools into 3D modelling.

Moving up the ladder have a look at google sketchup and blender.

Later, depending on what you want to make you can move to Solidworks, Zbrush or Rhino.

There are a lot of options.

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If you are just getting started I would probably recommend to have a look at tinkercad, 3Dslash and Morphi. Those are all super accessible tools into 3D modelling.

Moving up the ladder have a look at google sketchup and blender.

Later, depending on what you want to make you can move to Solidworks, Zbrush or Rhino.

There are a lot of options.

 

As for moviecostume replicas and such? Helmets which program do you recommend?

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I would probably recommend something down the lines of Zbrush, which is more of a sculpting tool. I could also recommend to check out some youtube video's and get in touch with the designers to find out what they use. But most modelling tools require a lot of training, tutorials and time to use on a high level. If you browse our 3D print section you may also find some prints which are up your alley and you could ask the OP what they use.

Good luck!

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It depends on whether your models are mainly geometric machine-like parts, or rather organic parts?

To start with geometric models (machine parts), I would suggest you have a look at DesignSpark Mechanical, which is a limited version of SpaceClaim. Legally free. This is rather easy to learn, and you can find a lot of good tutorial videos online.

For organic shapes, Blender is very powerfull freeware, but not that easy.

Maybe you could also have a look at a modeler such as Form Z (www.formz.com), which is more geared towards architecture and product design? It is not free, but the price is still acceptable. Their user-interface is also quite easy to learn, very intuitive. And they have free trial versions. Probably also free student versions (requiring proof).

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I would like to mention FreeCAD. This is a very powerful set of tools under a single roof (possibly including the slicer engine although I personally prefer to use a standalone program for that). It is very actively developed and becoming increasingly powerful.

For that kind of object (raised drawing), you can for example:

 

  • import a bitmap image or picture of a model shape
  • draft a B-spline curve on top of it
  • convert this curve to a sketch (2D section for 3D operations)
  • extrude or dig the sketch into a 3D solid object
  • convert the solid object into a mesh and export it (STL...) for slicing

 

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I use Zbrush for organic sculpting but use Modo for all other 3d tasks. www.luxology.com

There is a cheap indie version you can buy on steam that has most of the functionality of the full program.

One ofor the best tools inside of Modo is a plug-in called meshfusion. A subdivision modeling boolean tool that is editable and spits out clean watertight meshes. Watch the video to see it in action.

 

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