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hubert

Layers not sticking to one another

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[media=33195]Folks, I've been searching for a while and can't find a good description of my problem nor a solution. All hints in the right direction are welcome!

First my prints didn't want to stick to the glass in neither of my printers. Got that solved using blue tape (no way can I make it stick to glass, but that is not the issue here (I think)). Now my 2+ prints fine. But not the 2+ extended printer, the layers of filament don't stick to one another (see picture). I have upgraded the printer firmware, reset the print to factory defaults. I have reloaded Cura (latest version), reset to the values for Ultimaker filament (which I'm using). The only change is the initial layer height (.2) and initial layer speed (15mm/sec for 3 layers), which makes the print stick to the plate (plate has blue tape). The print sticks fine to the plate, then the trouble starts. The only oddity I notice is that the printer is very sensitive to room temperature. If I turn of the heating and the room goes below 55 degrees F then I get a temp sensor error.

The pictures:

IMG_0091.thumb.JPG.c190303395ac4c563cf5e1ea3df4ed41.JPG

IMG_0090.thumb.JPG.94ef00690dad54efe4d90d0ce1c6796b.JPG

IMG_0089.thumb.JPG.9ef07d117ff9cb67da73844820a3a393.JPG

Thanks for any and all suggestions!

--Hubert

IMG_0091.thumb.JPG.c190303395ac4c563cf5e1ea3df4ed41.JPG

IMG_0090.thumb.JPG.94ef00690dad54efe4d90d0ce1c6796b.JPG

IMG_0089.thumb.JPG.9ef07d117ff9cb67da73844820a3a393.JPG

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I've never ever heard of layers not sticking with PLA but this is common with higher glass-temp materials. Are you printing with ABS?

I think your temp sensor is flakey. You should watch the temp while it's printing. It should move very very slowly by 1C at a time and never increase or decrease by 2C within 20 seconds. If it jumps 10C at a time you have a bad temp sensor connection which is what I suspect.

You can't use solder in the temp sensors. Normal solder melts at 200C and even lead melts at 250C so instead it's a crimp connection which expands and contracts when you heat and cool. Some of these just weren't crimped quite right (imagine a tiny piece of brass o ring crimped around the wire connecting to the temp sensor lead).

I recommend you get a new temp sensor. I sell them for $18 (I think) here:

http://thegr5store.com or you can get them at fbrc8.

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gr5: my reply seems to have disappeared, probably user error just like this printing problem. I loaded ABS and treated it in Cura as PLA. Doesn't work. Fixed that problem, then it printed well for a while.

Also replaced the temp sensor but the machine does not want to print below 65F.

And now I have an extrusion problem. Sigh. This technology really isn't reliable yet, I spend more hours on maintenance than on printing :-(

Thanks for your help, Hubert

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gr5: my reply seems to have disappeared, probably user error just like this printing problem. I loaded ABS and treated it in Cura as PLA. Doesn't work. Fixed that problem, then it printed well for a while.

Also replaced the temp sensor but the machine does not want to print below 65F.

And now I have an extrusion problem. Sigh. This technology really isn't reliable yet, I spend more hours on maintenance than on printing :-(

Thanks for your help, Hubert

First off, don't give up! I spent quite a bit of time playing with my printer till it started working as advertised. A lot of reading, trial, error, and then more reading... I'm learning new things every day...

#1 - First off, PLA and ABS have different melting points. Mixing these up could cause all sorts of issues. Lesson #1 is "screw what Cura says and work with the values for the filament itself". It should all be on the label of the product. If you don't have the correct temperatures the layers won't bond properly to each other.

#2 - Glue CAN work, but I stay away from the glue sticks because they tend to not lay down on the bed in a nice even coating covering all the workspace. I instead use a mixture of 1 part Elmer's Glue to 2 parts water and spread thin coat of it across the bed. I have a writeup about this in another post (HERE).

#3 - I have experienced the ambient room temperature thing to a degree (I can get excessive curling on large prints - similar but different to what you are seeing). I am looking into putting on plexiglass sides on my printer to help trap the heat in while still being able to look inside (this supposedly helps in adhesion, bonding, and curling).

#4 - I would also ensure your bed is level and you have the right spacing between the print head and the bed. I use a business card to measure the gap (I want to say it is a .2 gap?). Also, verify your print layers are not too far apart. If there is too much of a gap, and if your ambient room temperature is low, you could have the plastic start to cool off before the bond is made (either on the bed or between layers).

#5 - Have you also considered turning off the cooling fan? If low temperatures are your issue, you might be exasperating it with the additional cooling of the fans.

Edited by Guest

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>Also replaced the temp sensor but the machine does not want to print below 65F.

This is news to me. Tell me more please. Is the firmware on the printer complaining or is your filament just not sticking to the glass? I have a video (it's long but packed with tons of tips) on getting your prints to stick like hell to the glass. ABS or PLA or other:

 

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