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Kaminoan

PVA, what is normal?

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I just bought my first 3D printer, an Ultimaker 3, and I have a few issues with PVA. First it seems to burn on the BB4 nossle. When printing it can loop back onto the nossle. When priming it coats the nossle. While this is troubling and having to constantly clean it is just that annoying. My issue is when using PVA for supports it gets stringy and prints poorly. It also seems to cover sides and not just below, which I don't understand. Let me explain. I am printing Thor's hammer scaled down for my son. It covers the whole mallet portion of the hammer in PVA, why? But again it prints with stringy messy edges and those can get stuck in the PVA layers. Just concerned. What is normal?

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The support on the side is adjustable by the "horizontal expansion" setting in CURA.

Ultimaker set's it to use a lot of PVA by default because PLA is sticking pretty poorly to PVA.  This way there will always be a PVA on top of PVA connection to keep stuff toghether.

PVA printing is not very easy, if you just got into printing you may want to consider printing single extrusion first, get to learn a bit more, than print multi color, get to learn dual extrusion, and only than start using PVA .....

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Thanks Ultiarjan for the Walk before you run approach, but I like to learn through doing. Is there somewhere or some book, that is best for figuring out all these hidden settings?

On the whole I have been fairly successful in what I am printing. I predominately have issues with the bed leveling and I keep fighting my way through that, but have pulled off some very nice prints. Ultimately I want to fine tune and print very small items with as high a resolution in Z as possible. So I am trying to figure out all the alterations and friends keep recommending simplified3d over Cura. Will simply changing software help that much or is it hiding these settings in a new place?

Thanks

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I have found that using an Ooze Shield helps a bit. I am using it more than the priming tower. Also, maybe try lowering your PVA temp a bit. Depending on Environmental conditions, it may be too hot. Also, different machines have different quirks. Back in the old days (When we rode dinosaurs to our jobs in the Quarry) we called it "Fingerprinting the Press."

I am like you, I jump right in and just do it until it works. I gum up a lot of prints, but, each failure is a learning experience, and sometimes, I luck into something new or, just find what fails in one idea is actually an opportunity in another direction. Kinda what we called "A happy accident" back in those dino days.

The only thing I can suggest, if you really are like me, expose all the controls, learn what they mean by doing a lot of small prints that take less time and plastic. And, read, read, read, research, research, research and do not worry about anything that someone would call "A Stupid question". We were all noobs at one point. After printing non-stop since January, I am still considering myself a noob A clumsy one at that. There is a lot of information out there that fills in blanks in the oddest places.

I just burned nearly 3 days of printing large items with a material I am not fully familiar with trying to fine tune my 14 inch Enterprise.

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As an after thought, I am not sure you need PVA supports, or any supports, for the Thor Hammer. The overhang bevels of the hammer are only about 45° and the machine should handle that with no trouble.

When I did my initial tests for overhangs and such, I found that I could get up to 65° without getting crunchy.

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As an after thought, I am not sure you need PVA supports, or any supports, for the Thor Hammer. The overhang bevels of the hammer are only about 45° and the machine should handle that with no trouble.

When I did my initial tests for overhangs and such, I found that I could get up to 65° without getting crunchy.

Thanks. I am a scientist by training and used to trial and error approach. I think I will turn on all the settings and start playing. I realize the Hammer likely doesn't need supports and have been playing more with printing without supports or PVA. Things are going fairly well, but as I mentioned I want to dial in the printer to print very small with high accuracy. My biggest issue is bed leveling and I am slowly digging through those issues now.

Jared

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Thanks.  I am a scientist by training and used to trial and error approach.  I think I will turn on all the settings and start playing.  I realize the Hammer likely doesn't need supports and have been playing more with printing without supports or PVA.  Things are going fairly well, but as I mentioned I want to dial in the printer to print very small with high accuracy.  My biggest issue is bed leveling and I am slowly digging through those issues now.

Jared

I am an autodidact by nature and an info junkie. Also by my experience, it ain't the tool, but the person behind it. And, a lot of people here use different tools, so it is good to get their experience as well.

So, I get the trial and error thing. And, you are in the right place to ask questions. If you want to see some trial and error at work, go check any of my posts. I am trying to share what I am learning as I am not far ahead of a lot of people here, but nowhere near as far or experienced as most others.

And, one of my favorite things is to be corrected. It is part of my learning process. Also, learning the lingo can be a pain. I look forward to seeing your posts in the future :)

Edited by Guest

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Also by my experience, it ain't the tool, but the person behind it. And, a lot of people here use different tools, so it is good to get their experience as well.

I agree. I have crazy large equipment at work and while, for example, it may function as a hammer if I can figure out how to make it work like a screw driver why not. Just because a tool has function X doesn't mean in the right hands it can't do many other things. This is what I am looking for out of my UM3. I want to know every limitation and how to push them into benefits.

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I agree.  I have crazy large equipment at work and while, for example, it may function as a hammer if I can figure out how to make it work like a screw driver why not.  Just because a tool has function X doesn't mean in the right hands it can't do many other things.  This is what I am looking for out of my UM3.  I want to know every limitation and how to push them into benefits.

 

I completely agree. One time, during an extremely 'poor' period, I received a commission to paint a piece for an advertisement. I had no real money to buy anything but the three primaries and white and black. Not even brushes. So, I painted it with Q-Tips that I had laying around and a re-purposed piece of illustration board.

I will tell you that the UM3 is a very robust machine. I have been printing with it since the middle of January practically non-stop and, it has take abuse from my clumsy hands and just general "Let us see what happens if I do......" It has never let me down, the people here have great insight.

Welcome to discovery land!! It is a blast :)

Edited by Guest

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Welcome to discovery land!! It is a blast :)

Been customizing LEGO figure for over 15 years. I silicon rubber mold, pressure cast, sculpt in clay, decal, create vector art, vacuum form, air brush, and a few other odds and ends all around customizing LEGO figures. I have been wanting to add 3D printing for ages, but was a bit afraid of the 3d creation software. Finally took the plunge and been having fun.

Flickr Gallery of my work

Glad to finally be in the sand box!

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oops?

I took a quick look. Nice stuff. :) You will definitely enjoy 3D Printing.

What 3D Software are you working with?

I have lost a lot of interest in the Autodesk products as a whole due to the company as a whole and lack of innovation. I Like what I have seen of Blender and have been playing with SpaceClaim. They have a lower end, free version of it, but it is a really nice, well thought out program. Nice paradigm they use.

I also use 3D Coat for a variety of things.

Edited by Guest

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