Jump to content
Cura Connect | Survey Read more... ×
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
shurik

Formfutura TitanX vs. OrbiTech SmarABS vs. Taulman Bridge Nylon

Recommended Posts

Hi mates,

I was asked to print a couple of details that will hold medical device components and battery which can get hot.

What's important to me is that its strong, heat resistant, accurate to print... and hopefully the exterior will be a nice texture too.

So I have Formfutura TitanX, OrbiTech SmarABS and Taulman Bridge Nylon. The later is really tricky to get printed decently.

Which one would you suggest for the best results?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can try Ultimaker CPE+.

The benefit is that Cura has printing profiles for UM material built in, so you don't have to find optimal settings yourself. These profiles are improving with every release of Cura.

Look up the specs here: https://ultimaker.com/en/products/materials/cpe

 

The PC material I use and have great success with is the Ultimaker PC. It is the strongest and highest temp material I have found yet. I do really like it a lot :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you make it stick to the glass? And in general, what are the recommended print settings?

 

For every material there are printing instructions on the UM website, look here for the instructions for PC. These are valid for PC from UM, your mileage for other brands may vary.

PC is tricky. For example, it is easy to pull the chips from your glass plate if you don't follow the instructions.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

How do you make it stick to the glass? And in general, what are the recommended print settings?

 

For every material there are printing instructions on the UM website, look here for the instructions for PC. These are valid for PC from UM, your mileage for other brands may vary.

PC is tricky. For example, it is easy to pull the chips from your glass plate if you don't follow the instructions.

 

Definitely. I just used those settings and they worked. I also taped up a bubble wrap barrier to hold in heat.

I have also printed using an exceptionally clean plate (alcohol) and even a PVA slurry to put a slight barrier between it and the glass. I have been trying to get other things done before I return to it so it has been a couple of weeks.

Here is a sample of the weirdness I do:

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/35928-can-the-um3-print-polycarbonate

I brimmed the heck out of it, but, to be fair, I did use a PVA brim just to keep air from the edges.

Again, I re-iterate, I was/am using the Ultimaker PC material. Every other make of materials from other vendors (PLA, Etc) do have different properties in general. So, if not using the Ultimaker PC, consider them a jumping off point.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you follow the advice on the support pages to use a raft?

 

To me? Nope...just winging it a bit with that sort of thing. The slurry I make from recycled PVA can be thick. I was trying to use the PVA as a cradle type of support on one set of experiments, but wow, environmental issues play with that prospect a lot. The black piece with the spikey parts was just on the PVA slurry. I was paying attention to temp (Bed and nozzle) and speeds mostly. I also used a bit of my experience with T-Glase with the bed height (just a tiny bit looser than the normal tightness I would level with and then did not active level as it would have wiped that out) so that it would lay down a nice, hot loop. It really bridged well. I could not believe how clean the arches were in the piece I printed and nice overhangs too.

As soon as I get this project finished (been the tech week from hell and really bad sinus infection the week before) I will be trying to print my supersized Enterprise with it. The only part I will use something different on will be the Red Nacelle Hydrogen Scoops (I will be using a transparent PETG for those). But it is what I am wanting to print it with primarily because of the strength it has. It will be a 39 inch model printed in parts and with those long, tube/angled parts, I do not want a weak plastic. And I have much more success with the PC than ABS.

That stuff is strong! But the PVA slurry did put a nice surface between the glass and the PC material. It was fun to let it sit and cool. I could hear it just cut loose from the PVA on the plate without any damage to the glass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eventually, I was not that much successful with the PC - the interlayer adhesion was too weak, I easily broke the part in one hand.
o_O

Wow, I had a print that I started over after about 10 layers because I noticed that I'd made a mistake and could not tear the part apart. I mean with pliers in both hands twisting and pulling.

And on another print I could bounce it off the floor. the only trouble i had was when I dropped a part and it hit a thin, spindly thing.

I am glad that you found something you like though. :) That is what counts. But at some point, you should try a different PC. That stuff is strong.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I printed at 250C.

Could that be that the filament was too wet from the air moisture? It did have a little bit of air popping up during the nozzle heatup phase but not during the print.

I would not know as you were using a different brand. There can be that much difference between brands. Could have been a speed issue too.

I know I slowed my print speeds quite a bit. But the brand difference makes it difficult for me to diagnose.

Maybe you could contact the manufacturer and give them the details and get some good info. I know I would like to hear that myself. :)

Info is always good to collect.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You mentioned TitanX from formfutura. Have you checked ApolloX? As I think I've pointed out a few times already on the forum, I'm a big fan of ASA. I've nothing but good experiences with it - it's quite easy to print, tough as nails, UV resistant and does indeed give a very nice texture. As for the heat resistance it's comparable to TitanX. Actually vicat softening is one degree higher (98 degrees C).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you checked ApolloX?

Yes. I had a chat with Formfutura representative (who was not really helpful beside citing the specs docs).

I went for TitanX as it has much greater impact strength (58KJ/m2 vs. 18KJ/m2 of ApolloX) and is almost as strong in tensile one (43.6 MPa vs. 47.5MPa of ApolloX).

Overall, I like this stuff. It is easy to print, nice surface finish, good layer adhesion, has some typical ABS odor, albeit much less than classical ABS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you checked ApolloX?

Yes. I had a chat with Formfutura representative (who was not really helpful beside citing the specs docs).

I went for TitanX as it has much greater impact strength (58KJ/m2 vs. 18KJ/m2 of ApolloX) and is almost as strong in tensile one (43.6 MPa vs. 47.5MPa of ApolloX).

Overall, I like this stuff. It is easy to print, nice surface finish, good layer adhesion, has some typical ABS odor, albeit much less than classical ABS.

Is it an ABS derivative? Or, maybe a better way to put it, a form of ABS.

I really should just google it, but I am on my way out for an appointment and I gotta prettyfy myself and that is a major effort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you checked ApolloX?

Yes. I had a chat with Formfutura representative (who was not really helpful beside citing the specs docs).

I went for TitanX as it has much greater impact strength (58KJ/m2 vs. 18KJ/m2 of ApolloX) and is almost as strong in tensile one (43.6 MPa vs. 47.5MPa of ApolloX).

Overall, I like this stuff. It is easy to print, nice surface finish, good layer adhesion, has some typical ABS odor, albeit much less than classical ABS.

Indeed, if the TDS is anything to go by, TitanX is just off the damn charts in impact strength - it's almost twice(!) normal ABS which is pretty damn impact resistant to begin with. So if that's what you need, TitanX is obviously something to be tried.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it an ABS derivative? Or, maybe a better way to put it, a form of ABS.

I really should just google it, but I am on my way out for an appointment and I gotta prettyfy myself and that is a major effort.

1) Yes, TitanX is some sort of modified ABS.

2) LMAO.

Thanks for the quick info. Just got back and it is nice to have one thing I do not have to do while I am solving modeling/printing problems/philosophies.

It can now be filed away in the attic of me mind and I can focus on something else and not forget. :)

We really need a 'thumbs up' emoticon. So, you get a heart instead <3

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can do one better for you: TDS

Doooooddddd :D

Thanks!! I will have to look into that as I have 3 spools of ABS that I do not know what I will do with it. I have better successes with the oddball stuff like PC/Flex/Semi-Flex than I do ABS.

I have gotten more knowledgeable, but I also find it to be brittle. But, I need to return to that once I finish my current projects.

Been stuck on making the best possible options for printing the 14" Enterprise and sometimes, it just takes a while to test options.

Thanks again!!

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • Architect Design Contest | People
      The goal of this contest is to design a set of people figurines that could be used in such a project to make an area, office or mall seem populated. 
      Think of different types of people in different environments, like walking people, people standing still, working people, and both men and women.
       
      • 8 replies
    • Taking Advantage of DfAM
      This is a statement that’s often made about AM/3DP. I'll focus on the way DfAM can take advantage of some of the unique capabilities that AM and 3DP have to offer. I personally think that the use of AM/3DP for light-weighting is one of it’s most exciting possibilities and one that could play a key part in the sustainability of design and manufacturing in the future.
        • Like
      • 3 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!