Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Florisvh

The usage of woodfill PLA

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone,

 

I got a question about the usage of woodfill PLA. Last week we finished a scaled model of an old church. Our client asked for a more 'natural' look of colors. 

So we decided to use 3 different woodfill PLA's (see images).

 

What we noticed right away was the difficult usage of the woodfill, most of the times it would either over or underextrude while also taking a fair amount of time to print.

We used a 0.8 nozzle (0.4 would clog), .2mm layer height, thick walls (3 layers) and a printspeed of 60mm/s. 

Does anyone have any experience printing scaled models using this type of PLA and can share their Cura settings? Since our business is growing im making standard cura setting profiles for all the different printing materials:)

 

Thanks in advance!

Maquette-klooster-vught-1.jpg

Maquette-klooster-vught-2.jpg

Maquette-klooster-vught-3.jpg

Maquette-klooster-vught-4.jpg

Edited by Florisvh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no experience with woodfilled filament. But if it is the matte finish of the models you are looking for, maybe you could find unfilled PLA that produces such a matte surface texture, instead of glossy? That would be much easier to print than any filled filaments, print faster, and probably be cheaper too. Some time ago I saw promo for a new matte filament, unfilled, but I don't remember the brand.

 

Also, colorFabb can now deliver custom colors, and it already has a lot of soft sand and stone colors available from previous custom orders and formulations.

 

Spray painting with a rough texture also could be an option. This might go faster than printing with filled filament.

 

If you have lots of identical models, like the tiny houses, then you could also design and print one mould in PLA, and then pour the models in gypsum. Make sure the mould can be opened, thus no undercuts. This would automatically give you the desired natural sandstone look. And it would go a lot faster, since it only takes a few minutes for gypsum to cure, instead of hours to print. Colors can be mixed into the gypsum powder, or be painted on.

 

The disadvantage of gypsum is that it is a dirty mess, and you should *never* pour water with dissolved gypsum down the drain. Never. Even not if there is only a thin mist of gypsum in the water. This will very soon clog your whole drain. You can pour water with gypsum in the garden however, it is innocent and even quite fertile.

 

If I had to do it, for these particular models, I would probably go the gypsum road.

 

Maybe these alternatives might be worth looking into?

 

That said, I do like the rough texture and dull colors of the models in the photos. It adds to the medieval look.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where did you your Woodfill from?

Maybe it is not the effect you are looking for, but perhaps the 'fuzzy skin' feature may offer you something?

 

From my experience, with Woodfill it is important to use a large nozzle, print as cool / low temp as possible and thick layers. 

What you want is for it stay as short as possible in your hot nozzle. 

 

Of course you also don't want it to under extrude either. And good to hear your business is growing 🙂

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!