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ian

I need some advice. which plugs ??

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I know this is not about an ultimaker but I thought because there are so many good electronic guys here on the forum I could ask a quick question.

I have lots of old 16mm home movies.

I bought myself a beautiful old vintage 16mm german zeiss ikon projector on ebay last week.

The question is. you have the projector and then a small power transformer.

the power transformer has only one single power cable connecting itself to the projector.

The projector only has one single male power plug.

I dont understand the setup ?

Does that mean, the power first goes into the projectors plug, then turned around, sent down the cable to the transformer, then sent back on the single cable to the projector and used....

here are two pictures to help explain.

Plus on the projector, it says 220 to 250V.... does the projector even need a transformer ??

i know i know not ultimaker but i wanted to ask some experts first before i kill myself tonight with electricity...... ;)

Thanks !!

Ian :smile:

unnamed.jpg

unnamed2.jpg

 

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I don't get it...

Can you make photos showing which device has which connectors / cables?

From what you wrote so far, it seems to me like:

The projector has 2 sockets (1x 2pin and 1x 4pin). The transformer has only one socket (4pin).

If that's true, then my guess (this is nothing more than a guess into the blue!!!) for some reason they didn't want to integrate the transformer into the projector (maybe there's EMI, or cooling issues, or it was simply a size matter).

But for whatever reason they sticked to "plug the mains power cord into the projector" and then connect the transformer to the projector with a single, 4 wire cable. That would be pretty stupid though. I think I'm wrong with that guess...

Moar pics please :)

/edit:

I suppose you didn't get the manual with the projector?

 

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The projector is running 50V only.

The external unit is the power adapter. The power supply gets connected to the projector, from there two wires are used to get into the power adapter. There you can select if you're on 100 or 210 V (using the locked switch). The two additional wires are used to bring the transformed power (now 50V) back to the projector. This is done by resistors in the power adapter.

This is basically because of the lamp in the projector (which is running on 50V only). I'm not sure about the motors....

I know: Power units on modern notebooks for example are much smaller .... :cool: :cool:

The good thing is: You can use the power adapter also as a heater.

 

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interesting... i will make a few better photos this evening to better explain.

So it seems like

POWER GOES INTO THE PROJECTOR.. two pronged plug.. then the power is turned around and shot back out on the 4 pronged plug to the power adapter... the power adapter heats up my apartment ;-) then chops the power down from 210 volts to 50 volts.. so the light bulb doesnt explode in the projector.. then shoots the power back through the same cable into the projector and bingo... KINO .... that is an amazing cable... allowing for the power to flow one way and the other...

Ian :-)

 

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..... bingo... KINO .... that is an amazing cable... allowing for the power to flow one way and the other...

Ian :smile:

 

The trick is that this is a four wire cable where no earthing is in use. Therefore two cables for one direction and two for the opposite direction.

And for sure you have noticed this 'Erde' label on the power adapter: For secure usage you should connect this to the earthing of your electrical installation. Otherwise it might be possible to end up with 230V on the housing of the power adapter.... :shock: (this means not only heating but also hairdressing in case you touch it .....)

Please be careful!

 

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One question, even more off-topic - there are some old 8mm Super films and I'm yet to find a good way to digitize them. There are still some services to do that on the Internet, but I'm reluctant to send this family treasure overseas with no real proof of quality.

Any recommendations, perhaps?

 

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In case you have a digital video camera and an old 8mm Super films projector on hands, this can be done by your own.

Just project the films to a good screen and in parallel record it with the digital video camera.

I've seen films archived in that way and they look very good.

 

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being honest. i have got some very rare color films from the invasion of normandy 1944 converted to dvd.. cost me a small fortune. Then I redid it at home in Ireland with a good 8mm film projector. With a good digital camera on a tripod and a good clean white surface about a meter away from the projector, the quality was the same.

I wa able to do the same thing for all my films and saved me thousands of euros.

Now I want to do this with my old 16mm home movie collection...

It should also be lovely to see them on screen for the first time. Im dieing to get this done.. I have a large 16mm color home movie taken by the private military secretary of Eisenhower in Tokyo Japan 1945. Never before seen color footage of him... :-)

 

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The trick is that this is a four wire cable where no earthing is in use. Therefore two cables for one direction and two for the opposite direction.

And for sure you have noticed this 'Erde' label on the power adapter: For secure usage you should connect this to the earthing of your electrical installation. Otherwise it might be possible to end up with 230V on the housing of the power adapter.... :shock: (this means not only heating but also hairdressing in case you touch it .....)

Please be careful!

 

Thanks Sigi for the advice !!

How best would I earth this? is there special little slip on device that i can buy that would ground this for me ?

I would like to power this up tonight and see what happens... but death is not for me tonight ;-) LOL

Ian :-)

 

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I think a cable with banana jacks will fit into this 'Erde' connector. If you have an alligator clamp for the other side it should be possible to connect this to the earthing of an electric socket. The earthing are the two visible connectors of a electric socket (not the two connectors behind the two holes !!!!! - be careful, never plug anything other than a standard power plug in there).

That setup will cause the earth leakage circuit breaker to switch the power off in case of a fault.

However, if you're not 100% sure about what you're doing: Keep the fingers off this! I don't want to hear that you got a new hairstyle because of some power through your body!!!

 

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And for sure you have noticed this 'Erde' label on the power adapter: For secure usage you should connect this to the earthing of your electrical installation. Otherwise it might be possible to end up with 230V on the housing of the power adapter.... :shock: (this means not only heating but also hairdressing in case you touch it .....)

 

 

Do you have a volt meter? I would just plug it all in and then without touching anything metal, use a volt meter to measure from ground to various parts of the equipment. Put the meter in AC Voltage mode, 500V range. If you don't know where ground is on your wall socket, you can use a metal cold water pipe.

If you find high voltages, switch that 2 pin power around the other way and test again.

 

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