Jump to content
UltiMaker Community of 3D Printing Experts

3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?


boraxflux
 Share

Recommended Posts

Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

3D-Print Experience in Haarlem

 

gallery_32794_417_28801.jpg

Doodle 3D-fish from 3D-Print Experience

 

Last sunday I went to the 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, an intimate event. It’s target audience: hobbyists, kids, starting enthousiasts, educational people and artists.

 

An interesting and ambitious printer is the Zmorph, a company busy with developing a multifunctional tool which can 3Dprint several materials and carve and engrave metals too. The latter two still in development phase. It’s concept: change the printing heads for the various applications.

 

A 3D-Chef was also present, he showed examples of objects printed in sugar. I’d like to have seen the actual machine as well though, that would have been a tasty sight.

 

Some printers capable of printing objects with a great height, Like the Delta 3D printer, a company which claims great presicion with their kind of technology. They are working on a "production printer”, a stand-alone printer with an usb-slot.

 

At Scanlounge you could get a 3D-picture of yourself, the visitor could step into a chamber with dozens of Canon-camera’s if I recollect it correctly. I’ve asked for the original stl-file to get our Ultimaker2 gnawing on that one...

The picture will arrive in three weeks.

 

Océ showed off their 2.5D printing a technology to create relief, with a reproduction of a Rembrandt as main attraction.

If you are an illustrator adept you can join their 2point5D Design Challenge [in Dutch]. Prize: your design printed in 2.5D

 

Ultimaker was there as well with a wall made of a few dozen printing Ultimakers. Had the pleasure to speak with one of Ultimakers employees and asked him about the release-date for the dual-extrusion for the Ultimaker2, he expected it to be a couple of months, no definite date.

To be honest: I can’t wait to print with two filaments in the same time, especially with a soluble filament to be able to remove support-structures in more delicate or unaccessable prints and hungry for news about other Ultimaker developments.

 

Lot more to see and experience. In short: left a lot hungrier than i came in :)

 

Ultimaker @ LANParty

 

gallery_32794_417_69512.jpgThe set-up

 

Every year a bunch of friends dive into a LANparty, we’ve seen a few developments on the small event, the introduction of the LCD-monitor, the first beamers and now the 3D printer as well. Last year we hired an Ultimaker1 from a collegue, this year we got our own and brought the Ultimaker2 to the table, it hardly stopped printing, a few Ultimaker robots for the LANparty-youth, a very small scale toy-PPSh gun, and structures from Minecraft.

 

gallery_32794_417_112458.jpgApproval from LAN-scene

 

Following the above experience, I am looking now for ways/ software that makes it easy for people with very little experience to design something and print it. Doodle 3D is nice. But are there other options? Easy to use software to create stl files? I’ve been looking into TinkerCAD for example, but that requires a (stable) internetconnection and can’t handle files bigger than 20 mb I believe.

 

gallery_32794_417_22246.jpg

Nightly visit, Ultimaker2 printing tirelessly

 

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    ...

    Following the above experience, I am looking now for ways/ software that makes it easy for people with very little experience to design something and print it. Doodle 3D is nice. But are there other options? Easy to use software to create stl files? I’ve been looking into TinkerCAD for example, but that requires a (stable) internetconnection and can’t handle files bigger than 20 mb I believe.

    ...

     

    Imho the easiest 3D design software to learn and master is Google Sketchup. It takes no knowledge at all to get into it, it's about as difficult as MS Paint.

    Sketchup 8 can export to ".dae (collada)" which you can load into Cura. There is also a plugin that can export STL files or DXF (polylines, for 2D or 2.5D machining, like lasercutting or CNC).

    Best of all, Sketchup is free :)

    I recommend Version 8, the newer ones are not really freeware.

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    Not shure what.s the target age. Learned my 13 yr old daughter "design spark mechanical" (also free) yesterday. she could work with it fast. Just a question here and there....

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    Something in the range of 8 years to 16... although there might be some more veteran LAN-members (up to 40 +) having a go at it.

    I've seen interesting examples, going to try that one as well, thank you!

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    One important question you should ask yourself is:

    Do you want a 3D drawing software, or a CAD software?

    Sketchup is cool, but it's not a CAD software. It's a 3D drawing program with which you can "construct" stuff with 0.1mm accuracy. But it's not an actual CAD program like Solidworks, Creo and the likes...

    Nevertheless, I think Sketchup can be a good "introduction" into mechanical engineering. And of course there are other suitable programs as well ;)

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    Not shure what.s the target age. Learned my 13 yr old daughter "design spark mechanical" (also free) yesterday. she could work with it fast. Just a question here and there....

     

    I recommend this above Sketchup. It's a lot more powerful, and at the same time, a lot less can go wrong.

    (Also note, my signature on printer! As well as the founders signatures)

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

     

     

    One important question you should ask yourself is:

    Do you want a 3D drawing software, or a CAD software?

    Sketchup is cool, but it's not a CAD software. It's a 3D drawing program with which you can "construct" stuff with 0.1mm accuracy. But it's not an actual CAD program like Solidworks, Creo and the likes...

    Nevertheless, I think Sketchup can be a good "introduction" into mechanical engineering. And of course there are other suitable programs as well ;)

     

     

    The only humble experience I have would be mainly Blender... and some tinkering here and there in a past education.

    With 3D printing in mind, what would be the pro's and cons between those two in your opinion, CAD and a 3D drawing program?

    The easy pull-and-push action in Google Sketchup is great, and I 'm just beginning to appreciate the possibilities of Design Spark Mechanical. Luckily some basics look similar between different 3D programs.

     

    I recommend this above Sketchup. It's a lot more powerful, and at the same time, a lot less can go wrong.

     

    Design Spark Mechanical seems to be a collaboration with SpaceClaim, which is kind of cool, on an introduction-event for the metallurgic industry SpaceClaim showed off there user-friendly interface...looked impressive (as was their price tag for just home-use, they did offer a free trial).

     

    (Also note, my signature on printer! As well as the founders signatures)

     

    ...we are so not going to clean that side :)

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    Guess I'll have a look at DesignSpark myself ;)

    The beauty about 3D printing is, you can print "3D drawings" as well as "3D constructions", as long as you have an intact mesh without holes.

    If you want to make artwork like sculptures, jewelry or toys, then a 3D drawing program would be your better choice.

    For accurate mechanical parts, maybe even with parametric customization abilities, a CAD software will be the easier way to reach your goal.

    3D drawing software usually has features like smoothing, polygon morphing and stuff like that, while CAD software rather has features that are important for part constructions, making mechanical drawings from your parts, simulating part strength or other physical properties and so on.

    Note that I don't have much experience with either 3D drawing nor construction software. Of course there's much more to that, but imho these are the main differences.

    You can make 3D constructions with 3D drawing software, and you can make sculptures with a CAD software. Depending on the toolsets you have available, it's just going to take you longer than necessary to reach your goal.

    Talking about toolsets:

    Sketchup doesn't have many. That's why it's so simple to learn. It's also why you will reach the limits of Sketchup sooner or later and need something better.

    But I believe it's a good point to get started and printing in a very short time.

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Posted · 3D-Print Experience in Haarlem, LAN-Party, easy software?

    Something in the range of 8 years to 16... although there might be some more veteran LAN-members (up to 40 +) having a go at it.

    I've seen interesting examples, going to try that one as well, thank you!

     

    and there's the powerfull feature to use STEP files in DSM;

    http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/2772-spaceclaim/?p=53816

     

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now
     Share

    • Our picks

      • Here it is. The new UltiMaker S7
        The UltiMaker S7 is built on the success of the UltiMaker S5 and its design decisions were heavily based on feedback from customers.
         
         
        So what’s new?
        The obvious change is the S7’s height. It now includes an integrated Air Manager. This filters the exhaust air of every print and also improves build temperature stability. To further enclose the build chamber the S7 only has one magnetically latched door.
         
        The build stack has also been completely redesigned. A PEI-coated flexible steel build plate makes a big difference to productivity. Not only do you not need tools to pop a printed part off. But we also don’t recommend using or adhesion structures for UltiMaker materials (except PC, because...it’s PC). Along with that, 4 pins and 25 magnets make it easy to replace the flex plate perfectly – even with one hand.
         
        The re-engineered print head has an inductive sensor which reduces noise when probing the build plate. This effectively makes it much harder to not achieve a perfect first layer, improving overall print success. We also reversed the front fan direction (fewer plastic hairs, less maintenance), made the print core door magnets stronger, and add a sensor that helps avoid flooding.
         

         
        The UltiMaker S7 also includes quality of life improvements:
        Reliable bed tilt compensation (no more thumbscrews) 2.4 and 5 GHz Wi-Fi A 1080p camera (mounted higher for a better view) Compatibility with 280+ Marketplace materials Compatibility with S5 project files (no reslicing needed) And a whole lot more  
        Curious to see the S7 in action?
        We’re hosting a free tech demo on February 7.
        It will be live and you can ask any questions to our CTO, Miguel Calvo.
        Register here for the Webinar
          • Like
        • 12 replies
      • UltiMaker Cura 5.3.0-Alpha 🎄 Tree Support Spotlight 🎄
        Are you a fan of tree support, but dislike the removal process and the amount of filament it uses? Then we would like to invite you to try this special release of UltiMaker Cura. Brought to you by our special community contributor @thomasrahm
         
        We generated a special version of Cura 5.2 called 5.3.0 Alpha + Xmas. The only changes we introduced compared to UltiMaker Cura 5.2.1 are those which are needed for the new supports. So keep in mind, this is not a sneak peek for Cura 5.3 (there are some really cool new features coming up) but a spotlight release highlighting this new version of tree supports.  
          • Like
        • 17 replies
      • New here? Get ahead with a free onboarding course
        Hi,
         
        Often getting started is the most difficult part of any process. A good start sets you up for success and saves you time and energy that could be spent elsewhere. That is why we have a onboarding course ready for
        Ultimaker S5 Pro Bundle, Ultimaker S5, Ultimaker S3 Ultimaker 2+ Connect.   
        They're ready for you on the Ultimaker Academy platform. All you need to do to gain access is to register your product to gain free access. 
        Ready? Register your product here in just 60 seconds.
          • Like
        • 14 replies
    ×
    ×
    • Create New...