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jemma-redmond

Material Safety Data sheet for ultimate blue pla?

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Is it food safe?

 

Official answer is no.

(While it's pretty safe to eat from, we cannot guarantee or officially sell it as food-safe. The germ comment is true, as well as that you cannot properly dish-wash it. It also absorbs moister so that doesn't help with the germs)

 

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Hi thanks, I did see that but I wasn't sure if that was actually the correct one for ultimakers pla materials... plus it does not stipulate added dyes, etc I have used pla to grow cells on and it works fine in comparison to abs, of course however I do know that flexible pla is toxic to cells...

Also does anyone know how much lead is contained in the brass extruders with um1's and 2's?

Thanks!

 

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Hi Jemma,

If this is for well plates or other labware, you might try T-Glase ("tee-glass"). It's a PETT material that is FDA approved for food contact; details at http://taulman3d.com/t-glase-features.html. I'm assuming you're either discarding them after use (in which case porosity doesn't matter as much), or autoclaving them?

If you're in the States, one place that stocks T-Glase is plenty of conversation around here about it.

I'm assuming you know about the NIH 3d Print Exchange?

Good luck, and let us know how it goes,

Steve

 

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Hi thanks, I did see that but I wasn't sure if that was actually the correct one for ultimakers pla materials... plus it does not stipulate added dyes, etc I have used pla to grow cells on and it works fine in comparison to abs, of course however I do know that flexible pla is toxic to cells...

Also does anyone know how much lead is contained in the brass extruders with um1's and 2's?

Thanks!

 

Send you a PM about someone who I think did some research on printing and sterile environments on the UM. He might be able to provide you some extra info.

 

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Thanks guys! that's some great info. well cells love pla that's for sure although interestingly I never did a comparison with pla with dyes and pla without. With regards to the t glass material steve, that is very interesting but would it not be cheaper to simply buy in consumables rather than printing them? Plus considering what can go onto these well plates could be hazardous it doesn't seem sensible to recycle them...

One last thing, does anyone know if there is medical grade pla on the market? that is for implants, surgical tools, etc? can it survive the rigours of autoclaving for example?

 

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