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tinydancer

Epoxy, Milliput or something else?

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Hey folks, I'm wondering if anyone has experience with using some sort of filler material that you could use to correct some errors in prints using PLA that you could apply and then sand them down to get a better finish on a part? I'm looking at model making, and the parts would be airbrushed afterwards.

Any advice would be appreciated. Cheers!

 

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You can use the plastic that is used in similar composition of some 3D printers.

There are liquid plastic welder, which cures under UV light in a few seconds, completely. The hardened plastic material can be mechanically treated in many ways. Gaps in a printed PLA- / ABS-Object can be completely closed in layers, this works everywhere where the UV light can pass through.

In some hardware stores and on eBay you can get those sets with liquid and light. The following is an example of a product ((( Bondic-Link: http://notaglue.com/ ))) that is sold exclusively in a German Bauhaus. Sure there are worldwide opportunities to acquire this or similar products.

Markus

 

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You have a couple of options you could use Mr Surfacer 500 with a brush or airbrush but if you airbrush it you need to thin it out quite a bit if you decide to go that route.

You could try this method down below

 

Member

Wallan

The urethane did set fast so I gave it a go with the sanding pad.

Incredible...

So easy and nice to sand and so smooth result.

I wish i had something larger to make a test on than this arm.

Regret that I put epoxy on the larger body part (but hopfully it works just as nice).

The Urethane I used was Mouldcraft SGS 2000 but I suppose other works just as well.

Actually I was surprised that it did not run more as I think the 2000 is a really easy flow kind of Urethane.

I think the urethane gets sticky and slow flowing in quite short time so if one rotates the part a little until the urethane sets a little I don't think there has to be much runs or any drips.

sml_gallery_25210_1425_47055.jpg

 

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