Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts

PLA and SCUBA


Recommended Posts

Posted · PLA and SCUBA

I've been thinking lately of things I could fab up that would be helpful when SCUBA diving. I'm really not sure of how PLA would stack up in the water though.

So this is a two part question. One, would PLA hold up vs various conditions underwater? And if no one is sure, maybe put together a bunch of test scenarios and I can just bring some PLA with me on the next dive.

So here's a list of conditions:

- Pressure at various depths (up to 130ft).

- Colder temperatures (I'm diving in Canada, its cold eh).

- Warmer temperatures (when diving on vacation). I know the glass transition temp is pretty low, but I don't think the ocean ever gets that hot.

- Constant exposure to fresh water.

- Constant exposure to salt water.

- Constant exposure to chlorinated water (for when testing in pool).

Other things based on what the PLA is shaped into:

- Small solid infilled objects (such as a printed clasp or carabiner).

- Small objects with 20% infill. Small pieces added to existing accessories (such as a stopper for the reel on your dive flag).

- How thick would container walls need to be in order to withstand pressure.

- Could you even make a container that held together well enough, if you employed rubber seals?

So, what do you think? Looking for answers, helpful advice, or even more questions to add to my list. :D

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    • 4 years later...
    Posted · PLA and SCUBA

    You will probably find that regardless of the material you use, the pressure will force water into the piece if it has any infill less than 100%, and perhaps even then, as there are always voids in any printed piece.

    Have fun experimenting, though.

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    • 2 weeks later...
    Posted · PLA and SCUBA

    Last year I printed a replacement skimmer flap for my (chlorine) swimming pool, its been installed for more than six months without noticeable degradation.

    The only problem is that it goes green inside - caused by bacteria easily removed by bleach, I plan to re-print but solid this time rather than hollow (with infill)

    My only other thought is that if you print anything which is hollow inside I suspect it will suffer from pressure, from my diving days the volume of air is half at one atmosphere depth, so the plastic would be damanged, so I would try solid (100% infill)

    hope this is of interest

  • Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now
     Share

    • Our picks

      • The Ultimaker Showcase — October 14. What's new?
        Your dear friends at Ultimaker have some exciting news and insights for you!
         
        • 0 replies
      • New here? Get ahead with a free onboarding course
        Hi,
         
        Often getting started is the most difficult part of any process. A good start sets you up for success and saves you time and energy that could be spent elsewhere. That is why we have a onboarding course ready for
        Ultimaker S5 Pro Bundle, Ultimaker S5, Ultimaker S3 Ultimaker 2+ Connect.   
        They're ready for you on the Ultimaker Academy platform. All you need to do to gain access is to register your product to gain free access. 
        Ready? Register your product here in just 60 seconds.
          • Like
        • 8 replies
    ×
    ×
    • Create New...