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JimT

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Everything posted by JimT

  1. Thanks. It's good to know that the North America Support website has information on the UM2(non+) that also applies to the Go.
  2. Thank you! My UM2Go has the spring too. Are the instructions for replacing the coupler on a UM2Go somewhere on the Ultimaker website? I couldn't find them. The UM2Go User Manual says that the instructions are on the website, but it doesn't have a link.
  3. I've just replaced the PTFE coupler on my Ultimaker 2 Go. I wasn't able to find instructions on how to do this for the Go, so I used the instructions for the UM2+ on this page: https://ultimaker.com/en/resources/50672-replace-the-tfm-coupler The print head on the Go is similar, but not exactly the same as the UM2+. Step 6 for the UM2+ says To tighten the front two thumb screws, use the calibration spacer. Place the tool in between the aluminum plates of the hot end. Tighten the front two thumb screws until the tool fits securely between the plates, but can still easily
  4. If that's the case, then it is a bug in Cura, which should be fixed.
  5. If you look at the footprint of the object, it does not come close to the clamps, so that's not the problem.
  6. I posted this in the printer forum, but no one there responded. The Ultimaker 2 Go is advertised as having a build volume of 120 x 120 x 115 mm, but I am frequently unable to print objects smaller than that. I get a message from Cura 4.0.0 saying that it is unable to slice because the model doesn't fit in the Go's build volume. I have Support and Adhesion turned off, so they shouldn't affect the build volume. I've attached an example STL file that won't print on my Go, even though it is significantly smaller than the Go's advertised build volume. I've also attached a screen print showing the e
  7. The Ultimaker 2 Go is advertised as having a print volume of 120 x 120 x 115 mm, but I am frequently unable to print objects smaller than that. I get a message from Cura saying that it is unable to slice because the model doesn't fit in the print volume. I have Support and Adhesion turned off, so they shouldn't affect the print volume. I've attached an example file that won't print on my Go, even though it is significantly smaller than the Go's advertised print volume. Is the Go's print volume smaller than advertised? Or is there a bug in Cura? go_test.stl
  8. For large pieces, you only cast a bronze shell, which is typically about 6mm thick. This usually means that you have to cut windows in the hollow wax to allow the investment to fill it, and use bronze pins to hold the interior investment in place when you burn out the wax. After you cast it, you weld the the windows back into the piece to make it appear solid, and then file and sand it smooth.
  9. Centrifugal casting machines are the most common kind used by jewelers and they can give very good results. There is a wide price range. Here's a link to a relatively inexpensive spring-driven casting machine. It can handle flasks up to 4" x 6" (102 x 152mm), although the flask that is included with the machine is smaller (90 x 102mm). The wax or PLA model shouldn't be any closer than 12mm from the sides and bottom of the flask, and 25mm from the top, so that limits the size of the pieces you can cast. This machine doesn't include a shroud so you will need to buy or make one. It is unlikely to
  10. It is possible. I cast this piece using a centrifugal casting machine because it is small, and it takes some force to get the metal to fill the mold completely. Larger pieces are easier. I've cast larger pieces in bronze without any special casting equipment. You will of course need some sort of kiln to burn out the wax or PLA and a way to melt the metal. I used plaster investment, and there are always some surface imperfections that you need to file and sand when you use plaster. Ceramic shell investment gives a better surface.
  11. I've previously posted some of my jewelry designs that I made using a program that I'm writing in OpenSCAD and that I printed on my UM2GO. I've printed over 60 of them in PLA so far. This is the first one I've converted to metal. It was cast using the lost wax casting process, but using a 3D print instead of hand-carved wax. Although I have done several successful casts using PLA (like the bronze bust in my profile pic), I decided to use castable resin for this piece. This resin has several advantages over PLA for casting. I have access to a Form 2 printer and casting equipment at the local c
  12. What kind of conductive paint do you use?
  13. And a couple of pics of the basic shape in the design at the upper right of the second photo. I made this one for February 14.
  14. Here are a couple of pics of the basic shape used in the three bug-like designs in the first photo.
  15. I'm so sorry about the power failure. Some other brands of 3D printer will automatically resume printing after a power failure. Perhaps Ultimaker could add that capability. I hope you can complete it. I'm looking forward to seeing it.
  16. They certainly show self-similarity, but there is no recursion in the current version of my OpenSCAD module. Recursion is a specific kind of algorithm that I have not yet implemented in my code, although my code often gives similar looking results. The chapter on fractals in Daniel Shiffman's book, "The Nature of Code", has a good discussion on fractals and recursion. Here are a couple of sound bites from it. "While self-similarity is a key trait of fractals, it's important to realize that self-similarity alone does not make a fractal." "Another fundamental component of fracta
  17. Thanks! The scarab-like ones are my favorites so far. I think of them as bugs from another planet. The filament is 3D Universe Green PLA. I bought a lot of 3D Universe filament during their Winter sale, and it is working well. I just started writing my OpenSCAD module in January. Although it is still quite simple, I'm happy with what the designs it can generate already. I have a lot of ideas for features that I'd like to add to it by the end of 2018. One of them is recursion. Recursion would enable it to generate true fractals.
  18. It's the fractal look of your piece that attracts me to it. My OpenSCAD module is based on the concept of defining a shape, and then repeating it at different locations, sizes, and orientations. This can give fractal shapes, as well as simple geometric designs. I've just posted examples of both kinds in the topic "More Jewelry Designs". Your print is looking great!
  19. I'm doing a design-a-day challenge in 2018. I might create several new jewelry designs some days, and none others, but the goal is to have 365 printed designs at the end of the year. I'm currently ahead of schedule. I just finished printing February 22. I previously posted some of my January designs. Here are eight of the February designs.
  20. What's the advantage of changing the feeder motor? Does it improve the print quality?
  21. Another four test prints.
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