Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
alberto

Leak at the end of prints

Recommended Posts

In all my prints sliced with Netfabb I get a spill on the piece at the end of the print. Please see the attachment.

This is caused by the nozzle continuing to extrude while is (slowly) retracted on the Z axis.

With the prints sliced with Cura I didn't have this kind of issue.

Any suggestion on how configurate Netfabb to prevent this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you sure it's extruding while moving the platform down? I'd think it's simply oozing you're seeing.

Regardless, you can fix this. Look under the "Machine" tab and you'll find a button with three dots in it (...) to the right of "Machine type". Click this button and you'll get a popup window full of settings. At the top of that window is a check box for "Move Z down after printing", uncheck this. Now switch tabs to the "Ultimaker (volumetric) specific" tab and you'll find a box where you can put in a GCode footer. You could probably steal the footer from cura and put that in there. If memory serves what cura does is retract a little bit and then move the head straight out to the side.

Underneath the "Move Z down after printing" checkbox there's also a "Move to position after printing" setting where you could tell the head to move to the side. However, I'm not sure how fast it will move and if it will do one after the other (that is, move down first, then move to the side thus having the same issue). Some experimentation is in order :) But I think the first suggestion is better since it gives you better control.

Hope that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This happens since the new version of netfabb. Because the 'dot' get so big, after you cut it, there is a white spot on the part. In the version before, the movement away at the end just results in a very thin string which can be removed without a tool. Can we have the old style of behavior at the end of printing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 0 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!