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danilius

Horrible noise from y-axis

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For a while I've been getting this noise from the y-axis of the printer, but I have no idea where it's actually coming from or what the problem is. I have recorded some of this here, and you can see that the noise only appears on longer moves on the y-axis. Short moves and x-axis moves do not make the same noise.

Anyone have a clue what the problem is?

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That sounds like the bearing in the print head is starting to go. I had the Y and then the X bearings go out two weeks apart. My machine was still under warranty so FBRC8 in the USA took care of it for me.

Is the print head difficult to move in the Y direction? Have you lubricated the axes recently?

I just got additional bearings, to have as back ups in case it happens  again (I have noticed increasing noise from my printer). I believe the bearings are LM6UU if your warranty is expired.

There is a recent post here about replacing the bearings in the print head.

https://ultimaker.com/en/community/19405-loose-bearings-in-um2-print-head

Edited by Guest

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I moved the head by hand, and it seemed fine and did not make that noise either. It's possible the bearings are going there, or maybe one of the ball bearings on the drive shafts. Problem is that I can't seem to track it down, and don't fancy replacing the shaft bearings if I don't really need to.

Oh well, it looks like I have some fun ahead of me :(

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Do you oil these bearings periodically?  It is recommended to put a couple drops of lite oil on the shafts.  I use sewing machine oil about every 5 -10 hrs of operation.  There are rows of recirculating balls inside of those bearings.  In extreme cases, the balls will scar the shafts in lines if they aren't rolling properly.  Do the shafts show any scars, grooves where the balls run?  Its stuff to check out.  It may be possible that your bearings are shot.  If you replace them make sure the shafts aren't also damaged.

Edited by Guest

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I use Singer sewing machine oil, and periodically oil the shafts. Having listened to the bearings closely, I think it is one of the rear left-hand bearings that sounds like it has an issue, the ones mounted in the walls. Has anyone replaced those? Is it difficult to do?

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Shafts are oiled regularly. It actually sounds like the noise is coming from the back right of the UM2. What is going on back in that area that might need maintenance?

There are a few shavings sitting on top of the little motor thingee <-- highly technical term.

IMG_0491.thumb.JPG.87bbbf68b2918813642b5db731fbf1e1.JPG

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I think one of the shaft bearings is going, because I'm getting weird problems when printing. If printing a square, on the front and left side the walls don't touch properly, and the infill in the rear left hand side is noticeably thinner than the front right hand side. Circles have walls that do not touch properly.

Now, you might think the temps or e-steps are incorrect (I swapped out the standard hobbed nut for a grooved one) but I checked both of those elements exhaustively.

So, how does one change the bearings? Has anyone got a video or some tips? Is it a complex operation? Where can I buy them from?

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Shafts are oiled regularly. It actually sounds like the noise is coming from the back right of the UM2. What is going on back in that area that might need maintenance?

There are a few shavings sitting on top of the little motor thingee <-- highly technical term.

 

It looks like your problem @ooper is a rubbing belt.  Is the dust on the motor rubber?  Watch the belts as the axes move and see of they are rubbing.  It looks like there are 2 'piles' of debris, each lined up to a side of the short belt.  I think your top pulley (directly above the motor) is not properly aligned the the pulley on the motor.  The opposite edge of that belt may be rubbing on the lower pulley.  If I am right, you'll need to use an allen wrench to loosen the set screws on the pulley and shift the pulley so it no longer rubs.

This problem should probably have been its own post since it appears to be a different problem than @danilius

Edited by Guest

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Well, I got my new bearings from Ultimaker (worked out cheaper than buying them from Ebay, interesting) and swapped them out on the left hand side. I think the noise had gone for good, but remains to be seen.

So, how painful was the experience? Actually, not so bad. The bearings slide off quite easily, and they were the least of the problems. I did not have to retention the motor belt either since I left the motor attached to the wall.

What I did discover was interesting. Some of the screws had their heads stripped and were difficult to remove, so they had been over-tightened in the factory. Um. Fortunately I had some spare screws which I was able to shorten to fit.

Also, from the day I bought the machine it never stood perfectly flat. One side always wobbled by a millimeter or so. No biggie, but now it stands absolutely flat. Yay!

Other than that, not much to report.

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