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krys

UM2+ fan shroud vs Labern's fan shroud?

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Hi folks,

With my UM2, I was using Labern's fan shroud and liked it very much. When I upgraded with the Extruder Upgrade Kit, I have been using the new UM2+ fan shroud and it seems to work decently too. So, I was wondering:

Which one is better? Is there even any significant difference that would make me choose one over the other (other than metal is better than plastic)?

I guess a related question is are there any newer designs that I missed that seem better than Labern's or the UM2+ shrouds?

I am not asking another "which fan shroud is best" question. I get that everyone has their favourites. I am just wondering about specific comparisons between Labern's and the UM2+ shrouds.

Anyway, any thoughts/insights would be much appreciated.

Thanks! :)

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So the Original UM2 Fan shroud had 0.6m/s air flow

the new one has 2.2m/s air flow

mine has 2.5m/s air flow

So percentage wise there is not much difference between mine and the new one. Mine is directed more where it needs to be and more even though.

I still like and use the metal fan shroud as you can print at 300deg all day every day and not worry about it. It also helps me sleep at night :p

Although cooling is important and can greatly help print performance, I think there are a lot more areas that can have a greater improvement on overall print quality.

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Hi Labern,

Thanks for your insights! Wisdom from the master! :D

So, versus the original, yours is better enough to be worth it. Versus the upgrade, the improvement would be marginal, and metal is more reliable.

I was considering printing yours in polycarbonate, like I did last time, if it was worth it, since it worked so well. But if there is not much improvement, and I plan on printing more in polycarbonate for other stuff, then sticking with the metal one might be the wiser idea.

Thanks very much for sharing! And thanks for the shroud!

If anyone else has additional insights, I would love to hear them too. :)

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Just a follow up on this topic.

I little while ago I did end up printing a new @Labern shroud as part of my polycarbonate experiments and I have been using it up until now.

Just today I had the occasion to measure and compare the Labern shroud with the stock UM2+ shroud with my (inexpensive) anemometer. My measurements were 1.9m/s for Labern's and 1.8m/s for stock. And those were consistently measured from 0mm to 1cm distances below the nozzle tip.

So, yeah, Labern's is ever so slightly better than stock, but not much. It is also a bit louder however too.

Side note: I lined the inside of the Labern shroud with Kapton tape and I have been able to print other polycarbonate stuff at 300C with the Labern shroud, and there was no warping of the shroud.

Anyway, just sharing some observations in case anyone finds it useful. :)

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Hi krys,

I would say, Laberns shroud is very much better. So how; it has a better "fluid dynamic" design hence delivering more flow, also the "pressure center" is "right" in the middle of the nozzle and here the flow go downward. As it is printed with a 3D printer, the layer lines improve the air flow.. The weight is only 9.5 gram (no infill), the very old shroud weight is 24.1 gram and the "new +" shroud is about 16 gram.

The very good thing about Laberns shroud is that how much better printing overhang is improved. And finally, it does not make vibrating noise due to high energy short stepping.

IMHO. Anything that is reducing the extruder assembly weight is well invested. Next may be to "gun drill" the two 6 mm shafts that is part of the "extruder assy" weight.

Oh. yes I've been using Laberns shroud for about half a year now.

So I'll say, again; Thank you Labern, well done!

Here's two test pictures (SLA) showing overhang (macro picture), printed with 70 micron 183 deg. C. 60 deg. C heat bed. The first one with top and bottom layer and the second one without top an bottom layer. Just wall and infill.

With, ofc. Olsson block and Laberns shroud.

You'll find info about model and more here:

http://archive.fabacademy.org/2016/greenfablab/students/13/Week5.html

And the pictures:

Here's the "normal" print.

SLA_test_object_1.thumb.jpg.c07bd1881efeed76f109207b3b0a6d12.jpg

And here's the print without top and bottom layers.

SLA_test_object_2.thumb.jpg.ae7d113a7b3955fac6e990d4dd3ed233.jpg

Thanks.

Torgeir.

SLA_test_object_1.thumb.jpg.c07bd1881efeed76f109207b3b0a6d12.jpg

SLA_test_object_2.thumb.jpg.ae7d113a7b3955fac6e990d4dd3ed233.jpg

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I agree. I like it better too.

Clearly a single number measurement like my air flow readings cannot capture the whole story. I was just sharing some experiences I have had.

I did not think about comparing weights though! Good observation! :)

Happy New Year!

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Hi krys,

Happy new year. :)

Well, I never did a flow test like you did, neither the high temp 300 deg. C!

I do have a little bulging in the front of the shroud, assuming this is due to the very close heat block. I'm only using absorbent of "glass fiber" as insulation, that's work well at all the other places but not in the front. Maybe I should try with the Kapton tape you're using.. Did you use infill when printed Labern's shroud?

Thanks.

Torgeir.

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I do have a little bulging in the front of the shroud, assuming this is due to the very close heat block. I'm only using absorbent of "glass fiber" as insulation, that's work well at all the other places but not in the front.  Maybe I should try with the Kapton tape you're using.. Did you use infill when printed Labern's shroud?

 

The Kapton tape idea came from an older/different shroud design by someone else (I cannot remember who). They even suggested several layers with some copper tape in between. I had printed that shroud in XT and it did, after many hours of printing eventually warp around the nozzle.

But the polycarbonate Labern one I have is still going strong. I found the copper tape did not do much, as far as I could tell.

Kapton tape is supposed to be able to take up to 260C and not transfer much of it. It is also as thin as Mylar or celophane. Real NASA stuff. :) It is also somewhat good for bed adhesion too, I hear, but it is expensive for a tape.

Anyway, to answer your question: No, no infill. Labern's description said it was not necessary, as I recall. :) And it came out fine. It is mostly all thin walls anyway, so there is not much room for infill.

Hope this helps. Good luck!

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Kapton tape is an insulator while copper tape will absorb heat therefore will warp faster.

Warping can happen and that's why it helps to print it in the highest temp filament you can get your hands on.

As said, no infill required

 

@Labern I was browsing Sculpteo recently and I see they have a Cyanate Ester Resin material that can supposedly handle up to 219C. Do you think that would be able to handle the heat of printing high temp materials like XT or CPE, I figure the nozzle isn't directly touching the shroud, that temperature threshold would work pretty well? I've been getting quite frustrated with the cooling bias on my UM2+, so I've been looking for a semi-permanent "fix."

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