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justinkd

ER02 Error with Bed Temp Sensor

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I'm getting that error with the bed sensor that a lot of people seem to have. I have tried swapping with the TEMP1 sensor and the error switched to ER01, so guessing there is a problem with the sensor itself.

What are my options now for fixing this?

I have a replacement temp sensor already as well.

Thanks for your help anyone.

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Hi justinkd,

Welcome in here!

We'll need to know the kind of printer (Ultimaker?) you have in order to give an advice about this.

But basically, you swapped and confirmed a difference, so next thing to check is the wiring from the connector (on main board side) to the attachment screw at your heat bed. This just to verify that the wiring itself is good. Then you have to check from the screw at the heat bed, the resistance of the PT100 thermistor (if this is the type used in your printer), if it is PT100 - there should be a resistance around 110 Ohm (around 20 deg. C).

If you have the green colored screw terminal, make sure that the wire size is high enough to fill up so you have good clamping when tightening the screw. But do not over tightening here. In this green connector block, the upper half and lo part is not connected together.. The lo part inside here is connected to the thermistor.

Lastly, you can even measure the thermistor resistance directly on the heat bed PCB, across the resistor itself in order to verify.

Well, just some general things.

Thanks.

Torgeir.

Edited by Guest

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Hi Torgeir!

Thanks for the response.

The type of printer I have is an Ultimaker 2 Extended.

So not sure if I have the green coloured screw terminal you mentioned.

Couldn't seem to find it.

Also, I do believe that I have the PT100 thermistors.

I did check the connections, both at the PCB side and at the heated bed so far, to see if they were loose.

Today, I turned on the machine and I didn't get an error immediately.

With TMP03 and TMP01 switched, I did not get an error, even after about 5 mins.

I swapped them back and did not get an error immediately, but after about 6 mins I got the ER02 error.

I loosened the screws at the heat bed sensor location, maybe I over tightened it when I was checking for that problem. Now its up to over 45 mins with no error.

Should I attempt heating the bed again?

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Hi justinkd,

Welcome in here!

We'll need to know the kind of printer (Ultimaker?) you have in order to give an advice about this.

But basically, you swapped and confirmed a difference, so next thing to check is the wiring from the connector (on main board side) to the attachment screw at your heat bed. This just to verify that the wiring itself is good. Then you have to check from the screw at the heat bed, the resistance of the PT100 thermistor (if this is the type used in your printer), if it is PT100 - there should be a resistance around 110 Ohm (around 20 deg. C).

If you have the green colored screw terminal, make sure that the wire size is high enough to fill up so you have good clamping when tightening the screw. But do not over tightening here. In this green connector block, the upper half and lo part is not connected together.. The lo part inside here is connected to the thermistor.

Lastly, you can even measure the thermistor resistance directly on the heat bed PCB, across the resistor itself in order to verify.

Well, just some general things.

Thanks.

Torgeir.

 

Got up to an hour with not error. I touched the braided cable and lifted it slightly and then got the ER02 error.

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Hi justinkd,

Welcome in here!

We'll need to know the kind of printer (Ultimaker?) you have in order to give an advice about this.

But basically, you swapped and confirmed a difference, so next thing to check is the wiring from the connector (on main board side) to the attachment screw at your heat bed. This just to verify that the wiring itself is good. Then you have to check from the screw at the heat bed, the resistance of the PT100 thermistor (if this is the type used in your printer), if it is PT100 - there should be a resistance around 110 Ohm (around 20 deg. C).

If you have the green colored screw terminal, make sure that the wire size is high enough to fill up so you have good clamping when tightening the screw. But do not over tightening here. In this green connector block, the upper half and lo part is not connected together.. The lo part inside here is connected to the thermistor.

Lastly, you can even measure the thermistor resistance directly on the heat bed PCB, across the resistor itself in order to verify.

Well, just some general things.

Thanks.

Torgeir.

 

Got up to an hour with not error. I touched the braided cable and lifted it slightly and then got the ER02 error.

 

Hi justinkd,

I'll assume we're talking about the cable going from the bed and into the left inner corner? This is actually the one that will fail after some "thousand" printing hour, but very much depend of how it is routed. The weak points is close to the heat bed, or just in the left corner. If your cable loom move mostly at those two places, they likely tend to break just here. Intermittent on off "contacts" is typical for this issues.

This cable loom should bend evenly over the length, strain relieved in the corner and at the heat bed.

Good luck.

Thanks.

Torgeir.

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