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LePaul

Original Ultimaker 2 hotend upgraded to 2+ spec?

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I'm curious if anyone has upgraded their UM2 hotend to the UM2+ spec?

I know a lot of people upgraded to the Olsson Block introduced in late 2015. But I know since then, there is a new spacer, the coupler is of a new material, etc.

I'm not sure what else has changed inside :)

I am assuming it can be overhauled to the latest/greatest version?

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Hi there,

Before I went 2+, I had replaced the spring on my UM2 head with a 3D printed version to help reduce stress on the PTFE tube. It worked fine. Whether I got any benefit or not, I do not know, though. I could not really tell the difference. I suspect it is more of a longer-term benefit than an immediate one, unless you have retraction issues.

Since upgrading to the 2+, I bought an I2K wafer insert and so the stock metal spacer would no longer fit. So I printed an adjustable height replacement that worked just fine.

For me it is the Olsson block, and I suppose the TFM, that I really appreciate on the head of the 2+. The metal spacer being better I just take on trust. :)

And of course, the better feeder/extruder really is a significant upgrade.

Hope this helps. :)

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What is the problem there? I use the metal spacer and the wafer and it fits nicely.

 

Well, I you know, I never actually tested that! :D I had read that it did not fit and that is why some people designed specially modified spacer rings and/or adjustable spacer rings. So I just took that at face value.

Also, logically, given the tolerances involved, it just make sense to me that adding an extra mm of height would throw things off.

Though, on the other side of things, some people order PTFE/TFMs cut shorter to accommodate the I2K and others cut them themselves. I did not want to do that.

But, I never tested my assumption. So thanks for that info! :) I will have to check that out the next time I re-insert my I2K.

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It can fit, but you make the nozzle be 'out' 1 extra mm, exposing it a bit more to the fan air. Ofc this isn't biggie with 35W, but when the fans go max it can make fluctuations on the temp until PID fixes it. In general that makes a change of color for PLA.

For example on Materials of Ultimaker, clearly they had a fluctuation on the temp, making the silver color change, making rings, near the bottom.

Ultimaker-PLA-Silver-Metallic@2x.thumb.png.4bde8491bdad8b65fbf6e4a215593109.png

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Granted, low a wattage heater and a poorly tuned PID can result in problems but when upgrading you should of course invest in a 35w heater ;)

I will have a look if I see any artefacts on my prints.

But for your example: I get the point but that looks too bad to be just the fans blowing on the hotend. I mean my more exposed hotend is hit constantly with more air, so the PID should have an easy time to regulate.

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Um2 doesn't show current temp all the time unless you out some tinkergnome. On my umo+2 it shows all the time and I had to design my fan caps to avoid as much as possible that effect. Color banding due heat temp on pla only happens on bad brands OR when you are very close to the point where the filament goes matte. For example on faber I get perfect gloss at 225, but at 220 I get matte. So if the fan hits too hard I get a layer of banding. Ofc I solved all this, but was one of the things I tried to fix.

The easy fix is to use a e3d shock, cut some parts and insert it. Works fantastic to cut 90% of the air in the nozzle.

Edit: This effect happens when pushing the limits of speed. I do much 0.2 60-70mm/s 0.2 layers using 1.75mm filament.

Edited by Guest
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