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The Clumsy Noob Goes Supersized in the Noobverse

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OK, this is waiting for the 14 inch Enterprise to finish printing in about 36 hours. So, this will take a while. I have taken the model, supersized it up to 39.5 inches/1004mm, and broken it up, tabbed it for assembly and this is the first shot of the pieces and size relationship in Cura with the UM3+ as the build area. This is just the Port Nacelle assembly. All pieces have been designed to print flat. We will see how well that holds up, but that is the theory so far. And, yes, the tabs and slots are a "P" for the port assembly. Starboard will have an "S". Just thought it would make things easy.

PortNacelleParts.jpg

X-Ray View

PortNacellexray.jpg

I am putting the 14" up, but not so sure that someone would want something so large. I'm doing it to learn how to break up, tab and manifold a difficult model to eliminate the dreaded "red" areas in x-ray views. Designed for printing at 0.2mm (Draft) at the least.

Yes? No?

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Looks good. How many of these buildplates will you need to print?

Did that overhang on the second tallest part have support? Looks like it might need it.

Sometimes when you scale up or down, margins used by the original designer become either too small or too big, and therefor perhaps a less strong model (think of that 3D printed wrench for example). But I don't think that matters for this model, does it?

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Well, I am designing each model for printing close to original size. The small, 14" and supersized. There will be playing room for either upsizing or downsizing each model. But I wanted to really give something that worked within the scales I am printing.

Each model is a lesson for me. How to make water tight (and no red in the x-ray), scale up and make interlocking parts. If yer gonna play, just play with something you love and have intimate knowledge of.

I've been fighting a severe sinus infection that has moved into my chest and I am a bit behind in posting the follow ups.

For instance, the 14" had a printing flaw. Not enough to do another 72 hour print, but I did make a fix and will use it in the other thread as a tut on how to 'fix things' using my experience as a kitbash modeler. For instance, I made a custom Batmobile from a '67 Corvette. We had the '60s version (still a classic), the '80s versions (Tim Burton) and I made it to fill the '70s when it was drawn to be a modified sports coupe. So, used to makikng do with things that are able to be fixed. Some weirdness happened with the printing in a few spots.

But it will be coming up as soon as I am not feeling like death warmed over. The printer has been working a lot. Thank goodness I ahve a backup of test models to print while I sleep.

And, I did a quick test of the nacelle to check the joining pegs and scoop placement. Got that nailed. And, yep, it did require supports. Fortunately, it can be done by model settings and speed things along.

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I like the "P" and "S" features, for easier alignment and assembly. I have to remember that concept. :)

Are the two middle "vertical colums" separate parts? If so, I would print them in a separate batch. Then, if something would go wrong half way a print, you don't lose everything. And you can already start post-processing the first parts when the next are still printing.

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I like the "P" and "S" features, for easier alignment and assembly. I have to remember that concept.  :)

Are the two middle "vertical colums" separate parts? If so, I would print them in a separate batch. Then, if something would go wrong half way a print, you don't lose everything. And you can already start post-processing the first parts when the next are still printing.

I got to thinking yesterday about the 14" model and broke it up. Not everybody has a buildplate the size of the UM3+. So it got a P, S and E for Port, Starboard and Engineering. :p I do like the idea of shaped pegs and not built in joiners. If someone has to scale down any of the models, the tolerances get smaller and too tight. This way they can always scale down the pegs and apply a bit of horizontal expansion on the pegs to accommodate the tolerance change.

As for the supersized, well, Sander brought up a point I had to test. And, that meant resplitting the model to fit once you put in the support structures. That means the extra nozzle and a lot of space lost. So, in a way, back to the splitter. I am not sure how many buildplates at this time since I have to reconfigure. And, while only printing at 0.2mm/200 Microns, it will still take quite a while to print.

Between the antihistamines and just getting my antibiotics on Monday, my head is just beginning to clear a bit and not so much coughing. Sleep is a many splendored thing.

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Just finished resplitting the nacelle struts and arranging buildplates.

9 Buildplates in all (with current gang-up).

Ganging up the parts was based on Support or not.

Times are mostly between 10.5 hours and 20 hours with one being 43.25 Hours.

I have to get the 14 Inch model finished and posted before I begin this monstrosity.

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OK, it has been a while with all the printing and experimentation. I am assembling the parts and such for upload, so this would be more of an update. I am hoping to have everything together by this weekend and up for this and the 14" model. And, I am beginning the priming and prepping for final assembly. Currently the model is in 5 Parts.

1) Saucer

b. Engineering and Nacelles

iii/ Deflector dish

Quatro- Bussard Collectors are printed in different color for each Nacelle

These parts are all put together within their structures, but separate to facilitate the priming and prepping and pics represent a loose fitting of the three structures for size. Will be epoxied together for final painting and finishing.

Total length is just at a meter or 39.5" long. Each floor tile in the overhead shot is 13" on each side. The saucer alone is 17.5" in diameter. 22 Parts in all, 12 just in the saucer alone, not including the pegs to join the parts. Will have print shots on buildplate when I roll this thing out. As well as assembly instructions. All parts watertight and no red error areas in x-ray.

Took three containers of epoxy just to get to this point. Well, just over three....tried Gorilla Glue epoxy and it was not as good as the previous brand (Devon 2 Part syringe with 3500 PSI Bonding rating). Bought more Devon to finish the final fitting/gluing.

All parts printed without supports. The PC material did the best, but had to switch to CPE+ when I ran out of transparent PC. PC did not warp as badly. Did use rafts for both. But, wow, did the PC material handle overhangs like you would not believe. That or I got lucky....I never discount that. But, it even handled all the areas that SandervG mentioned. The patterns are from the transparent material showing the internal support structures and how each piece was differently aligned to fit buildplate.

There is the illusion that it has bad angles (Like creases in the saucer). It does not. It does have nice compound curves that will be clean once primed and painted. I will have to work out some warping I experienced with the CPE+, but hey, what model does not. Most pieces were printed one at a time to keep the print head from moving from part to part as some were tall and tended to wobble with just printing one part, let alone bumping into a tall thin piece and killing its adhesion. Did have to reprint a few because of that and the follow up will have methods I used to overcome this. May be not the best method, but, hey, it worked.

Top View:

Overhead.jpg

Front View (note that there is a 900 count bottle of Ibuprofen to prop the saucer. Since it is not glued on, it will tilt, but when glued, the model is quite balanced):

SupersizedFromFront.jpg

Edited by Guest
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Printing files are up on:

Thingiverse:

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2364660

Youmagine:

Only has optimized/low rez files for download. Thingiverse has full collection.

Link to full sized Instructions 4096 Wide-Suitable for Printing :) If you like such things....

http://www.kmanstudios.com/StarTrekSupersizedInstructionsFullSize.jpg

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OK, it has been a while with all the printing and experimentation. I am assembling the parts and such for upload, so this would be more of an update. I am hoping to have everything together by this weekend and up for this and the 14" model. And, I am beginning the priming and prepping for final assembly. Currently the model is in 5 Parts.

1) Saucer

b. Engineering and Nacelles

iii/ Deflector dish

Quatro- Bussard Collectors are printed in different color for each Nacelle

These parts are all put together within their structures, but separate to facilitate the priming and prepping and pics represent a loose fitting of the three structures for size. Will be epoxied together for final painting and finishing.

Total length is just at a meter or 39.5" long. Each floor tile in the overhead shot is 13" on each side. The saucer alone is 17.5" in diameter. 22 Parts in all, 12 just in the saucer alone, not including the pegs to join the parts. Will have print shots on buildplate when I roll this thing out. As well as assembly instructions. All parts watertight and no red error areas in x-ray.

Took three containers of epoxy just to get to this point. Well, just over three....tried Gorilla Glue epoxy and it was not as good as the previous brand (Devon 2 Part syringe with 3500 PSI Bonding rating). Bought more Devon to finish the final fitting/gluing.

All parts printed without supports. The PC material did the best, but had to switch to CPE+ when I ran out of transparent PC. PC did not warp as badly. Did use rafts for both. But, wow, did the PC material handle overhangs like you would not believe. That or I got lucky....I never discount that. But, it even handled all the areas that SandervG mentioned. The patterns are from the transparent material showing the internal support structures and how each piece was differently aligned to fit buildplate.

There is the illusion that it has bad angles (Like creases in the saucer). It does not. It does have nice compound curves that will be clean once primed and painted. I will have to work out some warping I experienced with the CPE+, but hey, what model does not. Most pieces were printed one at a time to keep the print head from moving from part to part as some were tall and tended to wobble with just printing one part, let alone bumping into a tall thin piece and killing its adhesion. Did have to reprint a few because of that and the follow up will have methods I used to overcome this. May be not the best method, but, hey, it worked.

Top View:

Overhead.jpg

Front View (note that there is a 900 count bottle of Ibuprofen to prop the saucer. Since it is not glued on, it will tilt, but when glued, the model is quite balanced):

SupersizedFromFront.jpg

 

That looks great! I really like PC. It's my favorite of the engineering materials. I find if I print it without fans, I don't see any warping.

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That looks great! I really like PC. It's my favorite of the engineering materials. I find if I print it without fans, I don't see any warping.

 

Thank you :) The PC is really nice. So far, I have only tested Ultimaker PC and it is rock solid. Holds overhangs and does a great job of printing, even in my primitive, not good climate controls in my apartment.

I just finished redesigning the Bussard Domes (Those red thingies) so that it can give a decent effect like they had in some shots. Though not lit, and playing with variances of thicknesses, it does have that sort of look like this:

jamie0005.jpg

I will be uploading those soon as well so that people have choices on how they proceed.

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I was not able to devote as much time today to finishing the Bussard Domes due to having to clean out my BB Core. Had to go back to Fbrc8's reference on hot pulls and Atomic Pulls and it took 3.5 hours to get it working again.....sigh.....

But, here is a test (Very quick test) of one of the new ones and I slipped a tea candle light in it just for funsies....

Will go up when I get all the kinks worked out and such.

BussardTest_A.jpg

BussardTest_B.jpg

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Looks like yours worked out really well! On the photo it looks like this is exactly the effect you want to give?

Did the BB core get clogged by PVA? How often has this happened?

Any idea why it happened?

Thanks!

For a full (ie, long winded) review of the issue, go HERE.

:)

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\Oh, and thank you for the compliment. It is all an ongoing experiment. My real goal is to make it look good unlit. Still got a bit to work on for that though.......The lighting was because I accidentally made the domes the right size for a tiny tea light candle (electric), But it did open up a few ideas to light it without major wiring.

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\Oh, and thank you for the compliment. It is all an ongoing experiment. My real goal is to make it look good unlit. Still got a bit to work on for that though.......The lighting was because I accidentally made the domes the right size for a tiny tea light candle (electric), But it did open up a few ideas to light it without major wiring.

Electric tea lights are great for lighting up prints.

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\Oh, and thank you for the compliment. It is all an ongoing experiment. My real goal is to make it look good unlit. Still got a bit to work on for that though.......The lighting was because I accidentally made the domes the right size for a tiny tea light candle (electric), But it did open up a few ideas to light it without major wiring.

Electric tea lights are great for lighting up prints.

Yeah, I should plan for that a bit more LOL.....It was a complete accident that they fit just right. The port nacelle dome is a bit shallow for the full tealight, but it does open up possibilities.

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\Oh, and thank you for the compliment. It is all an ongoing experiment. My real goal is to make it look good unlit. Still got a bit to work on for that though.......The lighting was because I accidentally made the domes the right size for a tiny tea light candle (electric), But it did open up a few ideas to light it without major wiring.

Electric tea lights are great for lighting up prints.

Yeah, I should plan for that a bit more LOL.....It was a complete accident that they fit just right. The port nacelle dome is a bit shallow for the full tealight, but it does open up possibilities.

I've printed a few different models that use electric tea lights. I like them. Admittedly, I also ended up ordering more tealights than I was expecting. I thought I'd ordered a 12 pack, but it ended up being a 24 pack at the same price. Win!

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I've printed a few different models that use electric tea lights. I like them. Admittedly, I also ended up ordering more tealights than I was expecting. I thought I'd ordered a 12 pack, but it ended up being a 24 pack at the same price. Win!

HA!! You can never have too many of that sort of stuff when you get it at the same price......Win! is right!!

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Thank you, but......I cannot take credit. Got 'em on Ebay. Gonna use a few of them for various projects. One will be a Pikachu lamp for my granddaughter. You can change programmed patterns (16 preprogrammed) and just gotta figure how to make the button accessible. But first to finally get all of this up now that I have all my proof of concepts done.

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In the unlit versions, they are varying degrees of thickness. When light passes through them, you get a set of subtle red shades with the pattern in the scoop. The lit version is the same set of designs, but with the lights enhancing the effect of 'spinning'.

the lighting is a round LED chaser light setup I found on Ebay for cheaper than I could make them. I just have to deconstruct them a bit for the next phase of my Noob experiments:

1. Redesigning the Enterprise for proper lighting and stand with switches. Not hard, just a bit busy right now and I still need to get the varying files up for this and the 14 Inch version.

2. Designing light stands to access the on/off and programming functions which will require the deconstruction/extension of soldered parts and switch designs to access the power and LED preset programs of different patters.

I am making a set of lit lamp stands for my grandchildren.

1. Pikachu for my youngest granddaughter

2. Harley Quinn for my Middle granddaughter

3. Spider light for my oldest, the Grandson

I like the flashies, sparklies and twinklies......

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