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corngolem

Print speed and temperature set in the slicer VS changed during print

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This concerns slicers in general but I'm posting here.

Is there a difference between parameters (especially print speed and temperature) set in the slicer and the same parameters changed on the fly during the print ?

And by this I mean, do slicers take into consideration the given temperature ? to for example adjust the print speed and flow on some part (bottom, wall, infill) of the print.

This leads to a suggestion: why don't slicers use the plastic's properties (as given by the manufacturer in the data sheet) to adapt the gcode and make a better print ?

 

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No, as far as I'm aware, no slicers are that sophisticated. The given temp gets set early on in the preamble gcode, but then totally ignored otherwise.

In theory, changing the speed and flow via the ulticontroller should be the same as having set them that way in the initial gcode, with the only exception that all head moves get speeded up uniformly by changing the print speed multiplier. As a result, all movements (except pure retraction/advance moves) are affected, including travel moves, whereas in the slicer you can set travel moves separately, and in some slicers (not Cura) you can set loops, infill etc to have different speeds. From the ulticontroller, they all get affected by the same proportion, but you loose the ability to differentiate, or to NOT increase the speed of your travel moves, if they are already set to be fast.

 

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There are 100s of features that need to be added to slicers and firmware. For example the slicer should automatically slice thinner layers on the tops of spheres. The firmware should take into account head pressure and delay when ordering more filament and when it comes out.

These software packages get slowly better every year. But it's a lot of work for the programmers and there aren't enough programmers in the world so please, tell everyone: "we need more programmers, don't major in art history - learn programming - it's not hard, it's fun, it's highly paid, and it's badly needed."

 

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