Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
nzo

Create black PLA earrings and paint with gold paint - anyone tried this on PLA?

Recommended Posts

You need some primer first, to smooth out layers and make the paint stick.

I have previously had good results using first some spray-filler (for repair work etc.) to smooth out the print... The stoff layers into cracks nicely and sands well.. Then apply a black shiny primer before the gold finish

Edited by Guest
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi tommyph1208...

Your help much appreciated - thank you! I was planning on printing with black PLA but I'm guessing whatever filament color I use, applying some spray-filler will give me a smoother overall result once the shiny primer and gold layers are added. By using a black filament, will I still require the black shiny primer?

Do you recommend any particular brand of spray for the filler and black shiny primer? I'm pretty clueless to model painting :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi tommyph1208...

Your help much appreciated - thank you! I was planning on printing with black PLA but I'm guessing whatever filament color I use, applying some spray-filler will give me a smoother overall result once the shiny primer and gold layers are added. By using a black filament, will I still require the black shiny primer?

Do you recommend any particular brand of spray for the filler and black shiny primer? I'm pretty clueless to model painting :)

 

The filler i used was light brown/sand colored, so yes you would have to apply a black shiny primer on top before adding the gold... The black before the gold is something I picked up on Adam Savages (former Mythbusters host) youtube page. He is very into cosplay, props etc. and does these one-day builds of everything from workshop machines and items to cosplay armors, weapons and gadgets.

I don't remember the brand of spray filler I used, but its doubtful you would be able to find the same type anyways, since I live in Denmark and you are from New Zealand... It doesn't get much further apart than that :)

I would visit an auto-parts store and ask for it, see what they have... It looks and sprays like one of those spray-color cans, but is somewhat thicker. The one I used was intended for cars and similar to fill out dents etc. after eg. sanding away rust and before applying paint and varnish.

Edited by Guest
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just out of curiosity: I always thought that you needed a primer color that was identical or very close to the final color, so that defects or scratches would be almost invisible. Then why would you use black as background for gold? Or does that give any special effect? Similar to the "red wine metallic on gold" that is sometimes used in special car paintings for a deeper gloss in the red metallic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just out of curiosity: I always thought that you needed a primer color that was identical or very close to the final color, so that defects or scratches would be almost invisible. Then why would you use black as background for gold? Or does that give any special effect? Similar to the "red wine metallic on gold" that is sometimes used in special car paintings for a deeper gloss in the red metallic?

I have never had an issue with primers having radically different colours from final colours. If you layer your paints properly, you can get a thin, opaque colour cover. I have always treated primer colours as something that should expose flaws based on the colour of the substrate it is covering. Grey primer does not really show up as coverage on grey plastics. Neither does white. But black can be sanded and you can readily see where things even out or you start to sand into the plastic and not just evening out the surface.

For doing things like the black backing is for using thin layers that start out very transparent and build to the opacity you desire. This allows the light to pass through and make for richer colours on many cases. Say a black background base with a red on top can go from a very deep cherry colour to a vibrant, bright scarlet red.

It also lends towards a 'deeper' look as you described.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just out of curiosity: I always thought that you needed a primer color that was identical or very close to the final color, so that defects or scratches would be almost invisible. Then why would you use black as background for gold? Or does that give any special effect? Similar to the "red wine metallic on gold" that is sometimes used in special car paintings for a deeper gloss in the red metallic?

Yeah, the exact "science" behind it I don't know, but as mentioned above, it was something I picked up from Adam Savages (former Mythbusters) youtube channel... He is very into cosplay, props, model making etc. and amongst others do these "one day builds"... I got this from an episode where he did a prop rifle with some metallic effects on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 0 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!