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UMO+ problems with bed leveling, and with nozzle temp

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I have been having trouble since I bought a new brass nozzle. I replaced the old one with the same type, after over a year of daily prints. Now I have two problems.

1. When doing the Checkup using Cura 3.1, the nozzle temperature never says "checked", even though the nozzle heats to 180C and stays with in +/- 0.5C. 

(I won't worry too much about that, since it's heating.) The X, Y, and Z-stops and also the bed temperature Checkup just fine.

2. The first layer is not good. I have set the Z-stop, and with blue Loctite for vibrating screws, held it in place, in the right place. The Z-stop seems to be fixed in place. I leveled the bed manually, using Z=0 on the controller. All good so far. Then I tried to print. First try, first layer, skirt and outline of part looked nice, but there was some lifting. So I stopped the print and added glue to the glass plate. Started over with the print. The nozzle was too close to the bed! I manually leveled again, moving the bed down with the 3 screws on the bottom, and it looks good. Print again - too far away! Next, I hooked up my PC by USB and go through Cura to level the bed. It did not need adjusting. But, the filament is still not touching the bed.

-- bottom line, bed seems leveled, but doesn't seem to be consistent. --

 

I also updated the firmware to DEV, 250000_single at the same time as I changed the nozzle. Could that have an impact?

 

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I use an old version of Cura (v15.04.6) to do bed leveling.  I haven't tried the newest version for leveling, but I like how the old version draws a large square on the plate to check the leveling after you have set the 3 points.

 

Assuming you are using PLA, try increasing your nozzle temperature to 200°C and set your initial layer height to 0.3mm, which is the default for Cura.  Thicker initial layers are more forgiving of sub-optimal bed leveling.  Once I have the bed leveled properly, I try not to manhandle the build plate too much removing prints, etc. just to make sure I don't disturb the setting.  Usually I can go a long time before I need to level it again, although eventually the nozzle tip wears or something else will cause it to need re-leveling.

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Thank you for reminding me about the older Cura, rowiac. That seems to work. I got my 3 squares printed nicely by moving the bed up a hair. This bed leveling wizard uses 210 C for the nozzle and 70 C for the bed - higher than my usual. I hope to get a successful test print! If you don't hear from me any more, I succeeded.

 

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