Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
astrodenny

How tight should a sliding block be against the axis?

Recommended Posts

Part C is called a "claw". You really have to tighten completely otherwise it won't clamp the rod properly.

When you assemble that piece, the current instructions suggest one nut on each side along with the screw head.

If you want to tighten your belts more you loosen that screw so the head sticks out more. This is how I tightened my belts and haven't needed anything else yet. Except I might have added a slightly longer screw (this may have involved a hack saw to get the right length - I don't remember).

This links directly to the claw assembly I'm talking about:

http://wiki.ultimaker.com/Ultimaker_rev.4_assembly:_X-Y_axes#Step_2:_The_claws

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me rephrase - I understand the claw and its concept, but I was curious to know if there should be any play in the rods. When you tighten the C clamps down for belt tension, it tightens up the rod as well. Should the rods be completely tight or should there be any loosness or play? I noticed that in the directions you have to find a happy medium between the belts being too tight or too loose. But any additional tightening also seems to effect the rods being too loose or too tight. I guess I'm trying to find the happy medium so that the rods don't shift in the slider blocks.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm having the exact same question as well.. using the claws both to tighten the belts and restrain the rotational movement of the sliding blocks is a kind of a hen&egg situation as the instructions (with video) clearly state not to tighten the belts too much, which on my machine results in the rods having quite a bit of play.

So far my prints look fine, but I'm worried if there are going to be any visible artifacts in larger prints from this play..

Cheers

PS: Really really really really happy about the machine. The prints really look and feel great, even when actively slicing low quality prints. Love it :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

Announcements

  • Our picks

    • Architect Design Contest | Vehicles.
      We're open for entries! - Design and submit your 3D designs of architectural entourage - vehicles - for a chance to win a large filament pack. Presenting an idea, an architectural design or something as big as an urban project isn't easy. A scaled model can really help to get your idea across.
        • Like
      • 14 replies
    • What The DfAM?
      I'm Steve Cox, an experienced engineer familiar with 3D printing. I wanted to share some DfAM guidelines with this community to help and make stronger parts.
      I'm also an Autodesk Certified Instructor for Fusion 360, so many of the images in ...
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 18 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!