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montejw360

How does Ultimaker get higher Z axis resolution?

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I'm looking at getting either a Makerbot or a Ultimaker. It looks like the Ultimaker can print in smaller Z layers than the Makerbot. How does it do this? Can it print at this low Z layer height in ABS? It looks like (to my eyes anyway) that the real high resolution models are printed in PLA, that's why I'm asking if it can do this in ABS as well.

The speed is a "cool factor" to me, resolution is more important.

Thanks,

Monte

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ABS shrinks a lot more when it cools, so if you print thin layers with ABS you'll run into more problems.

Personally I think Makerbot is behind on the Ultimaker, but as a dutch person I might be biased. But the Ultimaker is:

 

  • [*:jjq0dz9o]Faster
    [*:jjq0dz9o]More build area per machine size

 

It does has a slightly larger stringing problem then the Makerbot.

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mr_seeker, That is a bit far off.

The stepper motors are 200 steps per rev. The drivers are 1/16th microstepping. which means each motor step is

divided into 16 smaller steps. Makerbots use 1/8th steppers. So Makerbot = 1600 steps per Rev while

the UM uses 3200 steps per rev. But you can replace the stepper drivers on a Makerbot with 1/16th

drivers. I have a cupcake that uses 1/16th drivers on it.

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mr_seeker, That is a bit far off.

The stepper motors are 200 steps per rev. The drivers are 1/16th microstepping. which means each motor step is

divided into 16 smaller steps. Makerbots use 1/8th steppers. So Makerbot = 1600 steps per Rev while

the UM uses 3200 steps per rev. But you can replace the stepper drivers on a Makerbot with 1/16th

drivers. I have a cupcake that uses 1/16th drivers on it.

Sorry, was too busy with other stuff. Edited my post.

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The amount of steps per rotation of the motor say nothing. You need to look at steps per mm, unless they use the same threaded rods.

Right.

I think our Z motor is set to 1/8th, not 1/16th. Also think it was Clem that recently said that if you switch it to 1/16th, one step equals just under 1 micron - 0.00095mm or something.

Charles Pax at MBI recently said that their new machine is 1/16th stepping and one step equals ~2.5 microns so I'm guessing their Z screw is a bit steeper than the ones we use.

 

Also, they did 0.01 mm layers on a Prusa Mendel. So I think the Makerbot can do the same if you want.

Yep, a MakerGear Prusa.

I'd be a little surprised if any existing (or soon-to-ship) MBI machines could do 0.01mm layers without some serious care. Resolution has never been very high on their todo list.

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