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swatti

[Feat.REQ] Slow down before small external features

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I've noticed manually reducing speed to ~50% or below will make text on the surface come out lot nicer. However, it will affect the whole print, same if i lower jerk/JD and acceleration.

Print a vertical "plate" some ~80mm high and put letters on it on one side. Run suuuupa-speeeed and it will look horrid. Run sloooow and it turns out nicer.

Cant we have both? ?

I'm quessing here BUT i'd imagine its quite easy to measure how "long" the next loop is before the nozzle has to change direction again. If next loop is below say, 3mm, reduce speed for that short loop down to XX-mms.

Now the machine will do small details sloooowly and for instance, the big empty side of the forementioned "plate" fast as there are not text/details on it.

An advanced version would be to try to detect circular patterns, they may, or may not benefit from this setting. 

Running "concentric" infill pattern can be really fast on some prints compared to any other, BUT when running real fast, some infill-turns and sharp corners may end up looking ugly. Another spot to slow down, then slam-the-gas when printing longer lines.

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This might be available now.  Not sure.  You can split your cad part into two parts (2 STL files) - the portion that can be printed fast and the portion that should be printed slow.  You can put both parts into build plate, set settings for each differently (over on the left side of cura) and then select both parts at the same time, right click, and there is some kind of merge or something in the choices.

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Decreasing the acceleration and jerk settings should have a similar effect. Small features have a lot of direction changes and are therefore printed slower while long straight lines still reach a high speed. But please keep in mind that the extrusion rate might not be the same for slow and fast parts and small details might become thicker than wanted.

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On 8/20/2018 at 8:22 PM, gr5 said:

This might be available now.  Not sure.  You can split your cad part into two parts (2 STL files) - the portion that can be printed fast and the portion that should be printed slow.  You can put both parts into build plate, set settings for each differently (over on the left side of cura) and then select both parts at the same time, right click, and there is some kind of merge or something in the choices.


Would end up quite complicated in some cases. I was hoping to ease that with a simple setting.
 

On 8/21/2018 at 11:14 AM, Dim3nsioneer said:

Decreasing the acceleration and jerk settings should have a similar effect. Small features have a lot of direction changes and are therefore printed slower while long straight lines still reach a high speed. But please keep in mind that the extrusion rate might not be the same for slow and fast parts and small details might become thicker than wanted.


Decreasing the Jerk/JD and ACC settings affects the whole model, reducing speeds where they should be high. 

I run 32bit system that monitors extrusion along the whole path so no worries there.

-------------------

I print biiiig. Very big, but some parts have small details in the outer surface. The bigger you go, the more it means.

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2 hours ago, swatti said:

Would end up quite complicated in some cases

The thing is I don't think it's easy to define "small features".  A simple corner on a massive cube will be considered "small features" if it is a rounded corner.  Right?  Any definition of "small features" that you come up with for your model probably won't work for the next person.  That's why being able to specify exactly where you want to slow down is a great feature of both S3D and Cura.  Yes you have to create a second STL file but most CAD software lets you do this quite easily.  It may sound like a lot of work but I think it's pretty easy once you've done it a few times.

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