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trying to print an ho scale slot car

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ok; i have a creality endrer 3(new version). what makes it different from the previous; i really don't know. anyway; i have been trying like hell to print an ho scale slot car(upright). it just doesnt matter whether i use rafts and supports or not. it prints up to about 20 to 25 mm; and comes loose from raft! i am a beginner; i understand that; though i have read up as much as possible with the short time i have been attempting this. nothing seems to work. i assume it does not matter the printer; only the result. if anyone can help me; that would be outstanding.

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You should upload your Cura project, then we can see more, your settings and how the model looks like.

 

Normally you should be able to print without a raft, I assume you print with PLA? The Ender has a black build plate, looks like a BuildTak, is that right? Do you heat your bed to 50-60° for PLA?

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thank you for your response. yes; i heat the pla to 60 to 65. i do use the original bed which came with printer. i threw out the bad prints though i can gather the settings and reply back. i am using cura 15.04.3. the older version. i'm using this version since i am a beginner and am learning. like i said before; it prints fine until it gets to a certain point; then it starts to wobble and eventually breaks of raft. i heat the pla(matter hackers); to 200; soeed roughly at 30 to 40; 0.1 layer height; 0.4mm nozzle; retraction set at 100; though i have tried it at many speeds; retraction distance anywhere from 2.0 to 3.5; minimal layer time between 10 and 20; shell thickness 2.0; fill density 30 to 100; print speed 30 to 100; flow% 55 to 75; working with 1.75mm pla filament.

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Have tried to use a brim instead of a raft?

I don't think it has something to do with all your settings like infill, shell speed and so on. You have to make sure that the object sticks well to the bed and you said it is hollow you will only have some very fine thin parts which has contact the the bed, right?

 

Also check your bed, if it is leveled and if it is plain. If it is not plain you could have the problem, that the nozzle bumps off the object when hitting it hard.

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hi smithy. thank you for the heads up. believe me all tips are welcome. when you say plain; what exactly are you reffering to?????? is it straight edge plain you are pointing to? as far as the flatness of the bed? thank you again; for your reply. here are 2 pics of the print; that finally printed through to completion. i was able to copy so m e settings someone had been nice enough to post. i know going through the little i have; ones settings could be difficult to share. although isnt it all about helping people? anyway i am sure some think that way. who am, i to judge. thank you again. let me know what you think.

P1010190.JPG

P1010194.JPG

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That looks good, so the settings you have are a good start.

With plain I meant the flatness of the bed. It is not always really flat, but you could check it if you put a ruler or something else on the bed.

 

But do you have now, after the successful print, additional problems or is your initial problem solved?

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my initial problem seems to be solved. though what i have learned in a very short time is there are so many variables to deal with when 3d printing. it will always be a work in progress no matter how long one gains experience.thank you  i would like to eventually move up to printing with the latest version of cura; though do not know if the old version translates to new version of cura. thank you again for all your help.

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It is not so complicated as it seems on the first sight. You are right there are hundreds of settings you can adjust, but you can start just with the recommended settings which means infill %, support yes,no and choose a default profile. With these settings you can print 95% and the rest is learning by doing.

 

Search for a small object and use it to test and to play with the settings until you get a better feeling.

 

Good luck and have fun with your printer.

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On 11/24/2018 at 6:25 AM, yellowshark said:

Oh 200 for 30-40 mm/s and 0.100 layer is too hot. I would take it down to at least 190, probably 185; but it is influenced by the filament and I have never used 1.75

thank you yellowshark. i will try 190.

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Good idea, all part of that learning process 🙂 Lol there is always a danger in recommending on something you know nothing about; thinking it about, with 1.75 you need to move the filament through the system faster to deliver the same volume of filament that you get with 2.85 - so maybe you do need a hotter temperature, aarghh!

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