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Toke0555

Stück filament

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I have this problem where every time my printer starts putting filament out of the nozzle, it sticks to the nozzle! It’s like the first few millimeters just decides to go upword instead of Down, and gets stuck to the nozzle! It’s only the first few milimeters that does that but it drags it a little while before it falles of, with the posability of ruining the entire print! And that’s every single time it starts Coming out of the nozzle! Also sometimes while it’s printning it gets stuck, but only like af little bit! Maning little bumbs on the print and stuff! Please help me I have trues everything i can think of! And if the speed is 10% and the prints are Big enough it works okay but there is still something very wrong

- Toke

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You don't mention which printer you have.

 

On my Ultimaker 2 printers I have added a wire to wipe the nozzle after priming. It is spring steel wire, like used in dental bridges. This prevents the priming blob from getting dragged around, and molten filament on the outside of the nozzle is wiped away too. Due to the spring-effect, it does not hurt the nozzle.

 

In the beginning I manually pulled it straight down and kept it aside with a pincette ("tweezers" in English?).

 

See the pictures below. It is based on an idea of another user (I don't remember his name), who called it "filcatch", but I made it in steel instead of 3D-printed.

 

I am not sure if this is your problem, or if this method could be applied to your printer too. Use common sense if you would try.

 

Depending on the condition of the nozzle, and on filament type, during printing some filament may accumulate on the nozzle too. Printing slow and cool reduces the effect, but it is hard to totally eliminate. In PLA it usually is no problem, but in my PET it happens more often. And then gradually that residu gets brown, sags, and causes a big brown blob on the prints...

 

steel_filcatch1.thumb.jpg.2b3e229fdf742ed53c4aae4fd1e2016d.jpg

 

steel_filcatch2.thumb.jpg.fd3c7644d3c3de0d2f8b078fdad96205.jpg

 

DSCN5668b.thumb.jpg.2eb190238cc6c49d142b5a08fc6fc610.jpg

 

DSCN5670b.thumb.jpg.b7affaf8015dd95f017afc5a5dccc782.jpg

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, geert_2 said:

You don't mention which printer you have.

 

On my Ultimaker 2 printers I have added a wire to wipe the nozzle after priming. It is spring steel wire, like used in dental bridges. This prevents the priming blob from getting dragged around, and molten filament on the outside of the nozzle is wiped away too. Due to the spring-effect, it does not hurt the nozzle.

 

In the beginning I manually pulled it straight down and kept it aside with a pincette ("tweezers" in English?).

 

See the pictures below. It is based on an idea of another user (I don't remember his name), who called it "filcatch", but I made it in steel instead of 3D-printed.

 

I am not sure if this is your problem, or if this method could be applied to your printer too. Use common sense if you would try.

 

Depending on the condition of the nozzle, and on filament type, during printing some filament may accumulate on the nozzle too. Printing slow and cool reduces the effect, but it is hard to totally eliminate. In PLA it usually is no problem, but in my PET it happens more often. And then gradually that residu gets brown, sags, and causes a big brown blob on the prints...

 

steel_filcatch1.thumb.jpg.2b3e229fdf742ed53c4aae4fd1e2016d.jpg

 

steel_filcatch2.thumb.jpg.fd3c7644d3c3de0d2f8b078fdad96205.jpg

 

DSCN5668b.thumb.jpg.2eb190238cc6c49d142b5a08fc6fc610.jpg

 

DSCN5670b.thumb.jpg.b7affaf8015dd95f017afc5a5dccc782.jpg

 

 

 

 

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