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geeks

Issues printing time

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Hello,

 

My question may be in the wrong place. However, I would still clarify a detail.

 

I had fun with Catia, to create an original idea. Just to see what I could do or not Catia and Cura !

 

I read in a previous post on this forum, at the time of printing, the specified time was not good. I wanted to approach my impressions of good qualities, middle setting in Cura, I saw the time beyond 20 hours! However, I only have 8 hours per day printing available!

 

From there, I must find a way to calculate the amount of fillament a model and especially the time spent printing. That is why I want to know how I can do?

 

Now that I mention the thing that torments me more brains, I must also speak thickness of PLA and crush resistance. Indeed! Taking a cylinder, 3 to 5 mm thickness and 10 cm in outer diameter. At what pressure the cylinder break?

 

Depending on the answers, I know if my idea is feasible!

 

 

One last thing. I heard a lot about the history of the glue stick. I hope that as glue vinyl wood, it will be effective with the glass tray. In the latter case, it must renew the operation every time?

 

Thank you very much for your clarification.

 

Alex.

 

 

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You could use Autodesk Fusion 360. As far as I know they have extensive testing tools for such cases. Another option is Meshmixer - it has a rudimentary strength analyzer.

No idea about glue stick though. I have only tried wood glue + water.

 

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Ok, it's good to get a feel for the glue.

 

For Autodesk360, I think this is one of the tools. I had tried another but limited! So I'll try again. Before that, I start my design. It shows problems of exécusion time. I do not want to spend 200 hours of printing!

 

By cons, if other people want to give their opinion, I would totally agree. The more we notice, we also learn more from our mistakes.

 

Alex

 

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In the latter case, it must renew the operation every time?

 

Yes, but only where the part was.

Sometimes with the UM2, I watched the UM employees print at makerFaire and they usually had to set the bed temperature to about 40C or 50C to get the bed to stick better. In addition to glue stick.

I have not yet printed on glass.

 

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The print time estimate in Cura may still not be very reliable, especially if you are not using the very latest version.

The print time depends very much on your setting, of course. And your settings depend on how your object will be used. For very large parts, you can probably get away with thicker layers, in general. Functional/Mechanical parts you can probably print faster, than purely ornamental parts for which quality may matter more.

I recommend seeing what sort of settings will give you a print time that works for you. If you are not over-cautious in your settings, you can get a lot of printing done in 8 hours. Here are some ideas for saving some time:

- On a well calibrated printer, you can probably print most anything at 0.2mm layers, and 90mm/s. The finish quality might not be fabulous, and some difficult prints with fiddly or overhanging parts might not come out great. But it's a reasonable starting point, if the aim is to get something pretty good in a reasonable time.

- A skin thickness of 0.8 is probably plenty for most things.

- You may not need much infill at all, depending on your needs for strength.

- You might also consider whether you need a solid top and/or bottom on the piece, and how thick those layers are. On large flat prints the horizontal top and bottom surfaces can be a huge part of the overall print time.

- The first layer can take an age if printed very slowly. With PLA, you can print even the first layer at 75mm/s or more to speed things up.

Get the latest Cura, and see what adjustments you can make to get the print time down, and then see if those settings are likely to work for you.

 

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Well now, thank you very much for all this information.

 

I have done a bit more tight tube. The goal is to have 3/4 stackable elements. Waterproof it because it will withstand pressure of 2/3 bar from the outside, one bar inside.

 

Obviously I'm asking a lot. In the event of a structural failure, I would spend to method 2! Printed and molded resin + fiberglass. So for now, I'd kept the integrity and resilience. This can last for a complete filling. The print time also make the finish. So I think making smaller but more efficient. This is the size in diameter of the tube that matters, not its length.

 

Several slices of 50 mm to 60 mm max will be printed. I would put, I think the images quickly. But I do not really want anyone to know, otherwise the world would take me the idea!

 

Alex.

 

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Hello,

 

Re with me here is the news. After one night at work a little on my project, I concluded that I needed to do modular. It is for this reason that I start the design No. 2!

 

As an example, the final machine will certaineent consists of a stack slice 5cm. The back is not finished yet, it lacks a front and finally, I have to check that the collages will be sufficient. In theory, they will, in practice, I expect some surprises! This is the joy of design submersible RC!

 

In the meantime, I test my g-code in Rapetier, it's not so bad ads. The maximum is 9 am printing. It is!

 

Anyway, I almost solved the concerns and according to my advanced, I would ask you for other information.

 

Test-impression.jpg

 

Thank you.

 

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