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simon

First Print with ABS

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After a few teething problems with my UM2 I finally produced my first ABS print today.

Some areas worked well, and some, not so much. I just wanted to try out a model with some settings that I could work from.

Extrusion temp 255

Bed 100

retraction 5.0mm

wall 0.8

Top and bottom shell 0.6mm

This is what I was trying to print

Capture 2

First few layers were fine

IMG 1655

IMG 1656

 

The first problem started when it tried to cover over the infill. I think some under extrusion and possibly something else caused the bridging material to not cover over the ribs of the infill properly. These short lengths of material ended up standing on end point vertically up about 2.5mm above the current layer height.

 

IMG 1660

IMG 1659

IMG 1658

IMG 1657

The finished surface did eventually seal over but left an ugly box quilted effect on the surface.

I also had a bit of warping, but I expected this because I didn't use a raft. I wanted to see how much warping I would get.

IMG 1663

 

I also had under extrusion

IMG 1662

 

However I was very pleased with the quality of the side wall.

IMG 1664

 

I'm now reprinting this part because I need 2. I've increased the material flow to 130% and it's eliminated the box quilt effect completely. I've also used a raft, and so far the part hasn't warped. Its half way through. I'll post a picture when it finishes.

 

 

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Second print was excellent, warping reduced to a minimum using the raft and no more under extrusion. Only problem is removing the raft material. It has to be said the Afinia made a much better job of raft and support material. The Raft would just peel off easily with Afinia leaving a perfect surface. On the UM2 the raft material seems impossible to remove without sanding it down. This is a major disappointment. I've got to find another way to make the part stick without using a raft.

 

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I think I'll give that a go tomorrow. I'll also try the glue stick method too.

 

In the photos it looks like you *did* use gluestick.

I much prefer brim over raft. Also I recommend raising your print bed a little warmer to 110C to keep the ABS above the glass temp. You can test this: put a thin piece (preferably flat) of filament on the glass when it is at 110C. Let it sit there for 5 minutes and then try to bend it. It should bend into a new shape. If the heated bed is at 90C it should *not* bend. Being above the glass temp means the shrinkage stresses are spread out more throughout the softer material and so it stays on the bed better. The fan can wreck this though - some people use zero fan for large ABS parts.

 

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