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mnis

Ultimaker2 temp sensor defective.

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Hello people

By changing filament clogged the nozzle of my Ultimaker2.

I wanted to switch from Ultimaker (Silver) to Ultimaker (Transparent), since the first roll was empty.

I have to remove the clogged nozzle of Ultimaker2 and clean manually.

All other attempts did not help. Somehow I messed up and the temperature sensor is damaged, overheated.

Does anyone know by chance the sensor type or alternative sensors with matching case / sleeve (3.00 Milimeter). Is it a NTC or PTC resistor, or whatever?

Why am I so stupid?

I have this nozzle heated with a special lighter, and the sensor was mounted.

Does anyone have any idea?

You may laugh quietly when it is essential to have because. The nozzle is now completely clean ...

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Dont worry!

First when your nozzle is clogged. you 99% of the time do not need to remove your nozzle !! absolutly not !!

please read this:

http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/3600-what-works-best-with-cleaning-an-ultimaker-hotend-nozzle/

Secondly. If you have broken your temp sensor.. I would recomment you buy a new one from ultimaker. It is better safe than sorry and if you bought a replacement from ebay or china for a better price... and your ultimaker has a big big problem in the night... then ...mmm... not good !

So get yourself a new sensor !

Ian :-)

 

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The UM2 is still relatively new and UM hasn't published all the details of how to build your own, yet (they plan to do this later this year). So I don't know what the temp sensor is. I guess one could probably figure it out by looking in the comments in configuration.h here:

https://github.com/Ultimaker/SecretMarlin

 

Let us know if you figure it out.

Oh - also I deleted your other thread/topic for you.

 

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Thank you gr5

First of all:

Although many components of the RepRap scene are known, so I'm still convinced that the Ultimaker is a great machine. Since I'm sure, because the overall product is convincing. Specifically, the machine housing is fantastically well made and combines mechanical components in precision. The implementation for the linear axes is really awesome.

Of course, I am surprised that the problems only began with the filament change. Before there were never problems.

But I have an idea to avoid future nozzle clogging during the change of filament:

Filament change is probably always carried out with the last selected temperature. And when it is previously printed at a very high speed, the preset temperature for the filament - exchange could be harmful. If the change process is not fast enough, then the print head is at times not entirely filled with filament and it could quickly arise combustion residues.

So it would be good to always perform a filament change at very low temperature extruder. Just so warm that is reaches the melting temperature of the respective filament, no more.

What do you think?

I'll wait and see how the processing via the Ultimaker support precedes. So far, the contact runs fast and the communication is great.

I forgot:

Presumably, it is a normal NTC 100K, such as is used for many DIY printer. Only the thing is provided in a metal sleeve and the cable with a Teflon sheath. Possibly could have someone measure the resistance value of its non-connected sensor at about 20 degrees room temperature for me?

Markus

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So it would be good to always perform a filament change at very low temperature extruder. Just so warm that is reaches the melting temperature of the respective filament, no more.

 

Yes. Filament change is best done at 180C for PLA.

 

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