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braddock

printing multiple models

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Hi guys, I've been meaning to ask for a while, when you import multiple models into cura, how do you tell it to print both of them? I usually lay multiples out in other programs, and import as 1 object, but when I tried to do it in cura, it seemed to be printing just one model at a time?

Cheers.

 

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I find that the setting for "Print all at once" vs "Print one at a time" is wishy washy on my computer. Sometimes it prints them all at once, sometimes one at a time. The only way I know is if I check the layer view. Changing the setting to all or one doesn't change anything.

 

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"all at once" has the advantage that you can make sure the first layer worked on all the models before walking away but it prints much slower because it has to travel between all those parts X qty of layers. It also has the advantage that if you are printing something with a tiny top - like the antennae of the UM robot - there is more time to cool while it prints the other robot.

"one at a time" has the advantage that it prints much faster and if something fails part way through at least some of your parts are complete and don't need to be started over.

There are 5 "machine" settings that can prevent "one at a time" mode. Something like: left, right, top, bottom, gantry height.

 

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Exactly my question. Can someone better define what those settings mean: they are something like xmin xmax ymin ymax and gantry height. I can guess that gantry height is the maximum Z to which the x carriage can be raised before something strikes. But am really unclear if the x,y values are dimensions of the print assembly or exclusion zones, for two possibilities.

So a real definition would be great.

Thanks

 

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It's the distance the head sticks out beyond the nozzle. If you print something say 10mm high and then go off and print a different thing back on layer 0, you don't want any part of the print head and fans to hit the first object.

The gantry height is the height to those X/Y metal rods than can hit the part even if the head itself is far away from the already-printed part.

These distances are shown as a gray area on the print bead when you are moving parts around on it.

 

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