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netsrac

UM2 is scratching left side glass...

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Hi,

I've used by UM2 now for a couple of weeks, quite nice machine.

Today I noticed that the acrylic glas on the left side is already scratches by one of the extruder fan screws.

To be honest - nothing what I would have expected from a professional build machine...

Anybody have seen this on his machine? Any way to resolve this? Looks like a basic mis-calibration, right?

Already contacted UM support, but no reply yet...

Thanks, Netsrac

Ultimaker-scratch1.JPG

Ultimaker-scratch2.JPG

 

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I had this exact problem, I printed a small rectangle 3mmx4mmx8mm and stuck that to the bracket that comes in contact with the switch so it hits earlier. I tried bending it but it needed more. Now all is good. I will be replacing the switches with better quality components when I get time to help solve this.

 

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I had this exact problem, I printed a small rectangle 3mmx4mmx8mm and stuck that to the bracket that comes in contact with the switch so it hits earlier. I tried bending it but it needed more. Now all is good. I will be replacing the switches with better quality components when I get time to help solve this.

 

Any image on that to share? Thanks.

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Hmm. That should work fine but if you have a print fail and you want to continue it the next day (after homing again), you want the homing repeatability to at least .1mm accuracy (if not more!). So hopefully that little blue thing is repeatable and doesn't squish much.

Some people instead bend the metal part of the switch - they bend it a lot! Maybe give it a 90 degree turn 3mm from the end.

 

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Sure, all can be tweaked....BUT....I bought a ready-to-run machine and I expect that everything is designed the way it should work. That's why I choose the UM2 and not the "here are your parts to build a 3D printer" version.

If I start bending things, replacing switches and so, I'll loose the warranty.

I think it's Ultimaker who should come up with a solutions for this, not "me".

 

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3D printing, especially at this level, will involve a lot of fiddling with stuff. Even on the $500,000.00+ systems there is a lot to learn. You won't lose warranty by bending a switch, especially as you have it documented as to why on this forum.

It's not perfect this machine but its the best squirty plastic system out there right now, and very capable if you put some time.

 

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As fingerpuk said, you won't lose your warranty by making basic adjustments to switches, tightening screws etc. Of course you always have the option to send the printer back and have UM adjust it for you, but that seems like a lot of expense, hassle and downtime for a simple fix.

If you move the head by hand with the power off, you can get a sense of how much adjustment is needed. You may be able to just loosen the screws and slice the switch, depending on the case configuration (some printer frames have slots for the screws, others just have holes). Failing that, slightly bending the metal lever on the switch should fix it. You need to put a slight kink in the lever using needle-nosed (and preferably curved) pliers. Be sure that you are bending the lever itself, and not just straining the hinge outwards.

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These problems are usually caused by shipping. Shipping your entire printer back to UM and then getting a new one will probably have some different problem. Unless you can drive to UM headquarters and pick it up yourself I recommend you spend the 3 minutes it takes to bend the metal by 2mm with pliers.

 

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