Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
abstract

About to Start Mass-Production - Maintenance Tips ?

Recommended Posts

Hi Folks.

I am about to start a long run of prints (of the same thing) which will go on for several weeks. Maybe 100-200 2-hour prints.

My UM2 is already 6 months old, and I have not done any maintenance on it (except replacing the Teflon coupler and the Bowden tube).

I wonder if anyone can tell me the procedure for general maintenance on the UM2.

What should I be servicing before I start the run ?

Thanks

Mark

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd make sure that the short belts are tight, and the motors are pressed down and tightly screwed in place. Check that the pulley are tight and the axis rods don't wobble. And then add a drop of sewing machine or similar oil to the smooth axis- and cross-rods. And put a little green grease on the z-screw, and run the head up and down a few times.

Your printer is older, so less likely to be affected by the problems, but if you haven't applied the http://umforum.ultimaker.com/index.php?/topic/5935-z-axis-homing-inconsistent-on-um2-workaround-and-patch/?p=57095 to give more consistent z-homing, and avoid start-up extrusion problems, you might try that also.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd make sure that the short belts are tight, and the motors are pressed down and tightly screwed in place. Check that the pulley are tight and the axis rods don't wobble. And then add a drop of sewing machine or similar oil to the smooth axis- and cross-rods. And put a little green grease on the z-screw, and run the head up and down a few times.

Your printer is older, so less likely to be affected by the problems, but if you haven't applied the recent firmware patch to give more consistent z-homing, and avoid start-up extrusion problems, you might try that also.

Thanks for the tips.

Incidentally I think I may have a loose rod - its clunking alot more than it did when it was new and I have a feeling there is some forward to backward play in one of the side rods. How do I fix that?

Also, I noticed what may be a design-flaw, and lead to failures long term - the LED lighting cable is fouling one of the pulleys, and I am sure its going to eventually wear through it.

I have posted a video here: http://www.gallery.co.uk/private/UM2-LED-Fouling.mov

I will try to reglue the strip once this print is done, but I have noticed all along that the LED strip is trying to come off in various places.

Cheers

Mark

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd make sure that the short belts are tight, and the motors are pressed down and tightly screwed in place. Check that the pulley are tight and the axis rods don't wobble. And then add a drop of sewing machine or similar oil to the smooth axis- and cross-rods. And put a little green grease on the z-screw, and run the head up and down a few times.

Your printer is older, so less likely to be affected by the problems, but if you haven't applied the recent firmware patch to give more consistent z-homing, and avoid start-up extrusion problems, you might try that also.

So....

I have now completed 70 prints (140 half parts).... So far so good. The Faberdashery PLA is working out very nice at 0.2mm/75mm/sec. This is about 120 solid hours of printing.

However. I have started to hear the UM2 groaning a bit when the head moves across. I have a feeling it wants oil. So far I have done no lubrication.

Grease on the Z screw, I am happy with - and I have the UM supplied stuff.

I am still trying to get hold of some sewing machine oil, but I was not really sure what to lubricate - I read somewhere that the X/Y is 'self lubricating' - is that true ? Do I actually put oil on length of the metal rods ? I presume the bearings into the frame dont need oil ??

Could you explain precisely what "Smooth Axis" and "Cross Rods" actually means ?

Thanks

Mark

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While the bushings used are nominally 'self-lubricating', the reality is that all the sliding parts benefit from the added lubrication.

The smooth axes are the four, smooth 8mm diameter rods that the sliding blocks run on. The cross rods are the two smaller rods that run through the head. All of them benefit from the addition of a little light oil. Turn the power off, and put the head in the middle position, and put a drop of oil either side of the sliding block on one axis. Slide the head back and forth to spread it out. Repeat for each axis in turn. Then also repeat for the rods going through the head. Finally it won't hurt to add a drop of oil on the two smooth vertical rods, and move the bed up and down a bit to spread that out.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.amazon.com/Super-Lube-Spuer-Oil-4-Ounce/dp/B000UKUHXK/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1404659653&sr=8-4&keywords=super+lube

Been using this oil for several months on my X and Y axes... superior to mineral/sewing machine/3-in-1 oil in every way. Lubricates better, dries less quickly, doesn't leave any gummy residue when it does, doesn't attract as much dust.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

Announcements

  • Our picks

    • Architect Design Contest | Vehicles.
      We're open for entries! - Design and submit your 3D designs of architectural entourage - vehicles - for a chance to win a large filament pack. Presenting an idea, an architectural design or something as big as an urban project isn't easy. A scaled model can really help to get your idea across.
        • Like
      • 25 replies
    • What The DfAM?
      I'm Steve Cox, an experienced engineer familiar with 3D printing. I wanted to share some DfAM guidelines with this community to help and make stronger parts.
      I'm also an Autodesk Certified Instructor for Fusion 360, so many of the images in ...
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 23 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!