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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

I'm guessing that this may have been covered somewhere before but I cannot seem to find a definitive answer. I use an Ultimaker 2 and am looking to upgrade to the E3Dv6...the questions that I have are: can I, if so which voltage do I want? 12v or 24v, is this just looking for problems, etc? Anything that you all think I should know before I embark on this? and so on...Thanks in advance.

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

The E3D is 12V but you can also get a 24V version for the same price. I bought a 24V version since it fits well with the 24V power supply of my heated bed. Running the E3D from 19V is a bit problematic. It eather gets too hot or does not heatup enough. I know some people using the 12V version on 19V and tune the PID bit stayed away from that. If you connect the 24V version with a external power supply make sure the 24V can never enter your board electronics. I connected it with a external mosfet just to make sure.

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

Yes you can. It's easy to install now they have an pt100 version and you can also use the 24 volt heater.

But I would advice against it. I consider it a downgrade from the um2 hot end. I had nothing but trouble with the e3dv6.... pla is a nightmare. Maybe it's an option if you want your machine to be abs only... or need specific high temps for other experimental material... but for any normal use I would stay away from the e3dv6...

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

Hi Arjan

Sorry to hear you much issues with the E3D. Are you coming on tomorrow as well? We can talk then. I quite often use PLA....

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

If you connect the 24V version with a external power supply make sure the 24V can never enter your board electronics. I

 

I don't think there's any problem to just use the 24V e3d heater on the um2 board. At least I did not notice any issues here when I used it....

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

Hi Arjan

Sorry to hear you much issues with the E3D. Are you coming on tomorrow as well? We can talk then. I quite often use PLA....

 

I'm having a bit of a cold but I think I'll be there tomorrow. ...

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Posted (edited) · E3Dv6 Voltage

The post specifically state "I use an Ultimaker 2..." Those run 24V right? So there should be no problem with the 24V E3D...

Regarding the E3Dv6 hotend and PLA it is an ongoing discussion... Seems every now and then, somebody reports "what a nightmare" the hotend is with PLA...

I have yet not been able to tell if these are all user errors (E3D have some critical instructions on how to assemble, tighten etc. your hotend), or if it is just the case that every now and then, a hotend slips through E3Ds QA which shouldn't have...

I have only printed PLA on mine, and tons of it, and never had a problem...

Edited by Guest

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

I run quite a bit of PLA through my E3Dv6. I can say it only works well if I add 1 drop of sunflower oil to the filament (colorfab PLA) and after 12 hours of print it needs an other drop. No issue for me. Without the oil I get underextrusion there is simply too much friction in the hotend to get it through. Since I hardly print longer then 12 hours per print I don't have an issue but for long prints it might be. The benefit as I see it that the hotend can handle higher temperatures so for ABS and colorfab xt this is beneficial.

I never had a clog but I only turn the machine off when the hotend is below 50 degrees (keeps the cooling fan of the hotend cooler running). Otherwise the heat can get into the hotend cooler and melt the PLA there which would result in a nice clog.

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

@msd3 - just to summarize - for UMO which is 19V it's complicated but for UM2 which is 24V simply by the 24V version of the heater. However if you plan to print PLA it will stick and get stuck against the metal. PLA is very good at sticking to the metal and if you do any retractions at all (if you don't you will get horrible stringing) then your print will likely fail. But ABS does not stick so much to metal and will work great.

If you print only ABS then instead you could save money and just get the IPM from 3dsolex.com and print VERY hot if needed.

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

However if you plan to print PLA it will stick and get stuck against the metal.  PLA is very good at sticking to the metal and if you do any retractions at all (if you don't you will get horrible stringing) then your print will likely fail.  But ABS does not stick so much to metal and will work great.

 

What is this...? Seriously?

I have run lots of PLA prints with 6mm. @ 60mm/s retractions... Never had any PLA stick to anything...

I also do not use sunflower oil...

I agree with waiting untill the hotend is cold to turn off the printer....

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

 

However if you plan to print PLA it will stick and get stuck against the metal.  PLA is very good at sticking to the metal and if you do any retractions at all (if you don't you will get horrible stringing) then your print will likely fail.  But ABS does not stick so much to metal and will work great.

 

What is this...? Seriously?

I have run lots of PLA prints with 6mm. @ 60mm/s retractions... Never had any PLA stick to anything...

I also do not use sunflower oil...

I agree with waiting untill the hotend is cold to turn off the printer....

 

Well it is not the retraction that is causing the issue it is the friction of the bent filament touching the long cooler. Since colorfabb PLA is a little rough on the outside I think that that is the cause in my case that I get under extrusion. This is where my sunflower oil comes in. I think that smooth PLA it might not be an issue but I can't say from my own experience. I print usually at about 50mm/s for 0.1 layer height.

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Posted (edited) · E3Dv6 Voltage

Yep, 2.85 mm. bowden... Im not using the original UMO bowden tube though, got a new one either from E3D or some repRap store, I don't  remember anymore... Using the original UMO v2 feeder.

I have newer tried ColorFabb PLA, so cant tell if that can make a difference...

Edited by Guest

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

The original filament of ultimaker is quite smooth on the sides but colorfab has this little texture so I think that is causing it.

The coming weeks I will be running some XT filament and that does not have this textured surface.

I don't know what Arjan used for his experiment but he had also issues with PLA and the E3D. He did not use any oil.

People report clogs with the E3D but I have never clogged the hotend.

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage
On 9/6/2015 at 1:50 PM, zoev89 said:

The E3D is 12V but you can also get a 24V version for the same price. I bought a 24V version since it fits well with the 24V power supply of my heated bed. Running the E3D from 19V is a bit problematic. It eather gets too hot or does not heatup enough. I know some people using the 12V version on 19V and tune the PID bit stayed away from that. If you connect the 24V version with a external power supply make sure the 24V can never enter your board electronics. I connected it with a external mosfet just to make sure.

 

I'm having issues with temperature fluctuations. I searched the forums and read about using a higher wattage heat cartridge on the E3Dv6 hotend. I installed the more powerful heater and now I have problems with the printer shutting off during heat up. I researched some more on here and saw suggestions about getting a higher power supply. Got one and now I'm searching for info on how to properly wire it so that I don't damage the Ultimainboard. Can you please share a diagram of how you wired the external mosfet to protect the printer's electronics? Also which mosfet did you choose? I got a 24V 20A power supply.

 

Thanks

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

Hi Leonardo,

 

First warning do not run you UMO board directly from a 24V powersupply!

The board is designed to operate at 19V and one should leave it like that, If you run it from 24V you will burn the 12V regualort on the board.

I don't think you need a more powerfull heater for the E3D I use the stock 24V heater from E3D but I do run that part from 24V instead of 19V. 

 

So keep you 19V powersupply and keep that connected to the UMO board, unless you by a 24V->19V stepdown converter to operate the UMO board.

 

I added a small circuit to convert the heater output  signal to a 24V heater output signal. Give me some time to dig that up because I can't find it at the moment.

 

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

Hi zoev89,

 

I have an Ultimaker 2. Here's a thread I started with the details of what I'm trying to troubleshoot. 

Thanks for the schematic. The title says "3DPrinterFanHeater". Are you sure that's the correct circuit diagram? What are CONN_2 P1 and K1 CONN_3? Sorry my knowledge about electronics is still very limited.

 

Thanks!

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Posted · E3Dv6 Voltage

CONN_2 P1 is the connection on the ultimaker board where 1 is connected to the in my case 19V and 2 is connected to the output transistor of the heater. K1 CONN_2 pin 1 would be the + 24V of the powersupply and one side of the heater cartridge pin 2 would be the return wire of the heater cartridge and pin3 would be the gnd of the 24V powersupply.

 

Now I don't have much knowledge on the ultimaker 2 since I don't own one. The ultimaker 2 is powered by 24V so you would not need this output circuit. 

You can connect the 24V powersupply directly to the board. As it looks like on the schematics you would have to solder some wires to the input plug. There is no easy connector where you would be able to connect it.

 

Your original heater was 20 ohm so it would produce 28W of power and now you are trying 4.2 ohm which would result into 137W of power. Isn't that a lot? No wonder the powersupply will shut off. 

 

I added 2 circles on the ultimaker2 layout where the 24V input should be connected.

image.thumb.png.cf61d2c0f894c0208354ffe8a573a731.png

 

Make sure you don't create any short or connect the 24V the other way around, it could mean the end of the board!

You are dealing with a 400W power supply which is a serious amount of power. By the way I also use a 400W 24V powersupply for my ultimaker umo since I also have a heated bed.

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