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rubin

Layering gaps, post processing

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Hello everyone

First I want to thank all of you because I've seen how helpful you are

This social space is actually an amazing advantage for getting an Ultimaker..

So thanks

I've been able to make a successful print finaly..

It's an architectural model that I had to make a 40+ hours work just on  cleaning the file and optimizing it for 3d printing ..

20150923_225622.thumb.jpg.a194091465005cf06a866afd1ea83e5c.jpg

There are 2 major problems with tne model:

1- there's an obvious layering problem at the windows level.. while it's fine at other levels

20150923_225718.thumb.jpg.ee8140d762cf18152f12f5cde620425c.jpg

2- SUPPORT STRUCTURE: how am I supposed to remove all of this mess without tearing the model apart! That's a real big problem when it comes to architectural models.. because of the many overhangs that might show up ..

20150923_225454.thumb.jpg.2fe7386cacbd3a29b2641947592813ee.jpg

So based on your experiences .. what do you suggest? ?

Edited by Guest

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The bad quality at the windows is almost certainly caused by printing too fast and having the feeder speed up and slow down all the time for infill versus shell or for when it slows down at the corners for the windows. Either way have all speeds at 35mm/sec. If you are impatient for a print it's better to go to .2mm height than to go to 50mm/sec (assuming you want quality which is true for this print).

The support can be removed with the right tools - get some very small pliers that you can stick in the window and twist it out - then get a set of flat and curved small files that easily fit through the windows the short way to clean up the edges. Also consider using a butane torch but don't use that on this model until you've practiced with the flame on some models you don't care about.

You don't actually need support for windows because the UM bridges just great as long as it's a perfectly horizontal bridge which is true for the tops of windows and doorways. The few spots that need support can be done in CAD.

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Since I do make architectural models too - what @gr5 said + it is usually better to split a large model like that into parts and then to glue them. This way, if there is a failure at a certain floor, it will not ruin the rest of the model,it an be spotted more quickly and will cost less to fix. I also print separately balconies and the rest of the stuff that otherwise would need a support.

Overhangs for windows are not needed. UM2 can handle well gaps up to an inch (2.5-3cm) with no visible quality loss, given the rest of the print settings are OK.

Example:

IMG_9226.thumb.JPG.47fdce6147fa303e72294afc21b83e9a.JPG

IMG_9227.thumb.JPG.892350861252aa388760b87dc1c2452a.JPG

IMG_9226.thumb.JPG.47fdce6147fa303e72294afc21b83e9a.JPG

IMG_9227.thumb.JPG.892350861252aa388760b87dc1c2452a.JPG

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I've already started another print with the settings you've suggested. . I'll show you what comes of it

About the support. . Is there a way to control the thing?

like where to put or not to put... and what do you mean by support can be done in CAD?

Can you tell me more about the butane torch? Like if you have videos or photos

Thnx alot man .. you're amazing

 

The bad quality at the windows is almost certainly caused by printing too fast and having the feeder speed up and slow down all the time for infill versus shell or for when it slows down at the corners for the windows.  Either way have all speeds at 35mm/sec.  If you are impatient for a print it's better to go to .2mm height than to go to 50mm/sec (assuming you want quality which is true for this print).

The support can be removed with the right tools - get some very small pliers that you can stick in the window and twist it out - then get a set of flat and curved small files that easily fit through the windows the short way to clean up the edges.  Also consider using a butane torch but don't use that on this model until you've practiced with the flame on some models you don't care about.

You don't actually need support for windows because the UM bridges just great as long as it's a perfectly horizontal bridge which is true for the tops of windows and doorways.  The few spots that need support can be done in CAD.

 

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Wow.. that's so neat and smooth. .

What's the software you use for modelling?

you have any specific notes for the best way to achieve a good file for 3d printing?

How do you print in multiple color?

How exactly did you do the windows?

You print in PLA or ABS ?

that's a lot of Hows I guess ..Thanks again

 

Since I do make architectural models too - what @gr5 said + it is usually better to split a large model like that into parts and then to glue them. This way, if there is a failure at a certain floor, it will not ruin the rest of the model,it an be spotted more quickly and will cost less to fix. I also print separately balconies and the rest of the stuff that otherwise would need a support.

Overhangs for windows are not needed. UM2 can handle well gaps up to an inch (2.5-3cm) with no visible quality loss, given the rest of the print settings are OK.

Example:

IMG_9226.thumb.JPG.47fdce6147fa303e72294afc21b83e9a.JPG

IMG_9227.thumb.JPG.892350861252aa388760b87dc1c2452a.JPG

 

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Wow.. that's so neat and smooth. .

Thanks @rubin. To be honest, the photos do favor the models. If you would inspect them carefully, some imperfectnesses can be spotted, will mention them later. However, overall, the model looks really nice, indeed.

 

What's the software you use for modelling?

Sketchup + Cura. That's it. Oh, the original files from the architect were received as DWG, so the DWG viewer was also used.

 

you have any specific notes for the best way to achieve a good file for 3d printing?

As I replied you on another thread, try to use DAE format when exporting complex architectural models. However, small parts, like the balconies, windows inserts, etc. are better to be saved as STL. Do not know why. During the save, their scale goes off usually by the factor of 10, so you will need to either scale up or down by 10 or 100 but that's not a big deal, of course.

 

How do you print in multiple color?

No way to do so, mate. Each part has to be printed separately, cleaned and glued together. Lots of work but I do scale modelling, so it's my hobby!

Here, each balcony is 5 parts. The ground floor was printed separately. The rooftop too.

You can see a line above the 2nd floor. I was trying to print the whole box at once and it got screwed up above this level. So I cut off the bad part and printed what was missing. Yes, lots of work.

 

How exactly did you do the windows?

Separately printed inserts. Yes, lots of them, and in different sizes... BTW, I like the way the hollow windows look like on your model. Will probably suggest  this approach for the next models.

 

You print in PLA or ABS ?

PLA. Only use Colorfabb and Fabedashery brands.

 

that's a lot of Hows I guess ..Thanks again

That's no problem at all, always welcome.

Now, a few general things that came to my mind while typing the post:

 

  1. What material do you use? PLA is ways easier to work with but you have to keep in the mind its low heat tolerance.

  2. What print settings do you use? Bed temp., print temp., speed, layer, etc.

  3. Be very careful with the torch! Personally, I would not use it. The cheap blade knife does the job for me. Just keep enough plasters for the cut fingers. :)

 

The bed levelling or the bed temperature might need to be adjusted - there is one corner on your photos that is curved up. A brim might help here if a careful levelling and 60C bed for PLA are not enough.

Out of pure curiosity - by the type of the building and the writings on it - are we neighbours by a chance?

Edited by Guest
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To add suport in cad just create some kind of pillar that starts at the base and goes up and touches the bottom of (for example) a balcony on the outer 2 corners. Make the support sturdy - at least 1/10 as wide as high so 100mm support should be at least 10mm at base. But where the support touches the balcony it can be down to 1mm in diameter so it is easy to break off.

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