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JustCrator

Strengthening ties between the layers

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The idea: before slicing into the model are created the vertical holes such as that of the nozzle and a height of 5-10 layers. These holes are staggered at a certain distance of each other and fill the whole external surface area.

Then, when one of these holes is printed, it is filled to the full depth, creating a vertical spike.

Can somebody embody this idea?

I think many people want to add strength to their printed things.

Also I am waiting for comments.

layers.thumb.jpg.39d95e5473f76bc7e543e7be7ce47b72.jpg

layers.thumb.jpg.39d95e5473f76bc7e543e7be7ce47b72.jpg

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Hi!

It took me a few times to understand your suggestion, but I think I got it.

Do you mean you want to have a similar structure as reinforced concrete?

What would you use to fill up the holes?

And I assume this done in a solid print?

Do you think it is necessary? I already think 20%, maybe 50% already is very very strong.

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Hi!

Fill the hole by the same plastic as the printing.

Filling 20% -50 little effect on the rupture of the thin wall

Slicer should note these holes, so that during the G-code generation creates a record for filling of ready hole.

For example, I need a prototype of a water valve that will withstand water hammer. I think simple FDM will not sustain this burden on the wall.

This technology is applicable to the perimeter of the parts where there is a great effort rupture the layers.

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I apologize for the complexity of presentation ideas. Maybe with this picture will be better understood idea. This method can be called vertical printing and I think this is the next stage of development of FDM printing. Surface tension is weaker interatomic bonds of a solid plastic spike.

I understand that for most craft projects enough ordinary print settings. Unfortunately I have no time to study the slicer for the implementation my ideas. Presentation of differences simple printing and with spikes would have helped to the spread of this method.

layers2.thumb.jpg.c0955e154d48256e9ea0066f492053d1.jpg

layers2.thumb.jpg.c0955e154d48256e9ea0066f492053d1.jpg

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That's a really interesting idea. What I would worry about a bit though is if you can properly predict exactly how much plastic is needed to fill in the hole considering holes tend to shrink quite a bit.

I also have no idea what kind of pressure would be needed to be able to fill the hole properly and if that could pose a problem for the extruder. Would the top of the hole be weakened too much by heat from the nozzle while the plastic is being squirted into the hole?

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That should work with paste materials that don't work with heat. The problem I see on that it's that unless you use a longer tip (more like a syringe) the filament as soon as contacts the air or loose contact with the heat/nozzle change of temperature rapidly so as soon it touches other part it would block the entrance without filling the hole. A different nozzle with a long tip might work for filling the holes, but ofc that opens a broad amount of problems.

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Thank you for your good questions.

To reduce the load on the extruder, print hole is not round, but in the form of droplets to remove air from the hole. Select the optimum depth of the holes and fill them 3/4. I think the depth does not exceed 1.5 mm. If the hole 10 layers of which remained not filled with 2 layers bottom and one from above, the neighboring hole will start from the layer 4 and the spike will start from the layer 6. So, do not necessary to know the exact volume of the hole.

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