Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
asb

InMoov

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I'm not sure if this is the right sub-forum, but I'd like to point some attention to the InMoov project. The project's goal is to create an Open Source 3D printed life-sized robot. InMoov is not a toy, as of now, he has articulated finger, servo-controlled arms, he can speak (voice synthesis) and understands spoken language (speech recognition). He can be interfaced with hardware like Kinect and webcams, is being controlled through Arduino microcontroller boards and a scriptable software called MyRobotLab. Derivates equipped InMoov with sensors to smell chemicals or recognize touch. For me, InMoov was the reason to buy a 3D printer.

Under best conditions, it takes about 90 days to build an InMoov. For most of us without experience in robotics, 3D design, Python scripting and so on, it might take significantly longer. So it's not a weekend hobby project, but still an extremely cool use case for 3D printing. Also it's a great learning tool to understand developments that we will have to face sooner or later. InMoov enables us, to take part in this development, before major companies impose their products and rules on us.

Enough said for now. Have a look at the build instructions. All files are available for download and enhancement in STL file format. I have so far managed to print most parts of the head successfully, next comes the torso and the arms. There were some issues with processing ABS with the UM2+, so I went ahead with PLA. According to feedback I received about these issues was that some of the files could be enhanced. So maybe some of the more experienced builders feel an itch to throw in their expertise to make the InMoov files better.

And last but not least, is anyone else here already printing an InMoov with an Ultimaker?

Edited by Guest
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read about some people making it, have you already started?

I had the honour of meeting Gael a few times, what a genius!

Keep us up to date about your developments, I would be super interested to read it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you think your difficulties with ABS over PLA were because of the file or because of your print settings? I thought Gael preferred to print in ABS too.

As an alternative to ABS, you may want to consider giving CPE a chance.

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inmoov was actually part of a record attempt at protospace (The birth place of the Ultimaker!). They tried to print the entire robot on a small fleet of Ultimakers that they.

I also talked to the creator of the project and he's a great guy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have read about some people making it, have you already started?

I had the honour of meeting Gael a few times, what a genius!

Here is a map of current InMoov builders: https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=z97J-N7M1tkw.kszNjXUbWLl4

Yes, I have started building. So far I have printed ~20 STL files for the head, each taking between 4 and 18 hours on the UM2+. It takes time. Some parts will need to be printed again, because the prints were not good, and some broke during assembling, disassembling and reassembling. But the skull is more or less complete.

Originally I had planned to use the silver metallic PLA only for internal structures and got a white ABS filament for the outer shell. I think Gael's design is very smart as his InMoov just looks good. If he had built him in black or metallic colors, the huge robot would look scary.

I agree, Gael is a genius in the sense that he confronted a seemingly impossible task and approached it by solving the challenges one by one. Companies like Honda or Toyota are throwing huge $$$ into their robot development, and suddenly a guy from France 3D prints a completely own design and even publishes everything he accomplished as Open Source, how crazy is that? :-) You just gotta love him for what he did and how he did it.

Getting started with theUM2+ was easy in the beginning, as you can process a batch of files in Cura, then put a couple of folders with Gcode on the SD card and start printing for a couple of weeks without touching Cura again. Though, when you need to tune files and have to switch frequently back and forth bewteen printer and Cura, the UM2+ is not the best choice because of it's bad connectivity (that is, lack of connectivity).

With the supplied PLA, everything worked fine right out of the box (more or less). Then I started to use ABS, and everything got borked. Here is a thread about my issues with ABS. It took a while, but now the UM2+ is working fine again with PLA. Most of the InMoov files are good to process with the UM2+ and PLA; there's only one I couldn't manage to get printed properly yet (SideHearV3.stl), I'll work on that today…

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick update.

I got the problematic files printed; taping the brim to the print bed helped a bit, just enough to complete the prints. My spool of PLA is now gone, and I have switched back to ABS.

I'm now getting along with ABS. It's crucial not to use the UM2+ presets for this material, they are bogus. The German distributor recommended significantly different settings:

  • nozzle at 250°C
  • print bed at 100°C
  • turn fans off

Also they recommended a mix of acetone and ABS (2:1) on the print bed instead of glue, which I haven't tried yet.

These recommended settings are good, so far I get useable results now. I have no idea why UM ships the printer with presets that won't work.

Some thoughts about the material; I think ABS is better suited for the InMoov project as the surfaces are smoother and the printed parts appear to be more rigid. Printing without fans has the advantage that it makes much less noise, mine started to squeek about two weeks after the purchase. Not so nice is what the ABS seems to emit into the air; after being a couple of hours in the same room, my skin startes to itch; I'm not sure if this material is really safe, and it's not nice to be not able to keep the windows open when printing (prints will fail if cold air gets in). A printed designed for ABS should be enclosed, first to keep the temperature up, second to prevent distortions due to ventilation, and thrid to protect the air from emissions. Another thing I really don't like about printing with ABS is the power consumption; it averages around 80W with peaks up to 160W. Considering that printing InMoov will consume a couple of hundred hours of printing time, this is not so great. PLA consumes ~20-40W.

Anyway, ABS works with the modified settings, and results are quite OK. The skull is completed in PLA and will need painting; does anyone know which lacquer or paint will stick on PLA?

The internals of the head up to the neck I'm goint to print in ABS; when the ABS spool is finished in a couple of days, I'll switch back to PLA; this time I'll try a white filament from a different manufacturer and compare the results with the ABS prints.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Valcrow or @BaasB, you two are fairly experienced with painting PLA. What tips can you share?

If you want to read more about the ABS/Acetone mixture or materials in general I wrote about it in our materials Schooling blog recently.

 

@ASB PLA is actually more rigid, ABS has a little bit more give to it so it's a bit tougher. Aesthetically, ABS looks a bit more matte so it feels a bit smoother sometimes, but PLA holds edges slightly better so you get sharper corners on your prints.

About paints: All types of paints work on PLA - so long as you prime your object first with a good primer. I've tried all 3 kinds of paint, lacquer, enamels and acrylics and they all have their pros and cons, but they are all usable on PLA.

Acrylic - easiest to work with, dries almost instantly and relatively easy to fix mistakes. Not so durable finish however. Very inexpensive and many choices. Doesn't stink, not toxic and soluable in water.

Enamel paints - (the little model kit ones) Takes a very long time to cure 1-4 days. But as it does, it tends to 'pull' into itself a little bit so you get a smoother finish and if primed and sanded you get a nice shiny car like finish. The finish is very durable compared to acrylic. It goes on kinda thick too so it can hide lines a little bit. A bit stinky and soluable in mineral spirits or oil based solvents.

Lacquer paints - Extremely thin paints, if there are imperfections the paints will do nothing to cover it. Dries extremely fast and a very thin coat. You need to seal / protect it with something. Generally difficult and stinky to work with but some effects like shiney reflective metals is only achieved through some lacquer paints. You will need to fill/prime and sand for good results.

Hope that helps!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Everyone,

I have ordered my Ultimaker 2+ and will begin work on the InMoov finger soon, and then the hand. It would be cool to share the journey with others over the course of the build. Other ImMoov builders please shout out if your on the bandwagon.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Our picks

    • Introducing Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta
      Ultimaker Cura 3.6 | Beta is available. It comes with new features, bug fixes, and UX improvements. We would really like to have your feedback on it to make our stable release as good as it can be. As always, you can download the beta for free from our website, for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.
        • Like
      • 95 replies
    • Print Core CC | Red for Ruby
      Q: For some users, abrasive materials may be a new subject matter. Can you explain what it is that makes a material abrasive when you are not sure which print core to use?
      A: Materials which are hard in a solid piece (like metals, ceramics and carbon fibers) will generally also wear down the nozzle. In general one should assume...
        • Like
      • 30 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!