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Machinable wax

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For the last week I have been experimenting with Machinable Wax.

The Machinable Wax website suggests the details for 3D printing..

nozzle temp=140-150 degC

bed temp=65-75 degC

fans=on

print speed=20-70mm/s

These are the finding using a 0.4 nozzle, and layer height=0.2mm

The first thing I found was the nozzle temp. had to be increased to 175-180 degC

as nothing would come out of the nozzle at temps. below 170 degC.

The second I found was to turn the fans off, otherwise the print would lift from the bed.

The biggest problem I found was keeping the 3D print on the bed.

I tried hair spray, and the so-called Mod Podge (Elmers glue cut with water)

at bed temps between 30 to 100 degC.

I achieved to most success with a bed temp of 100 degC and hair spray (or Dimafix)

with a print speed of 20mm/s.

It was necessary, for the part in question, to turn on the fans to 20%, after 75 layers had been printed.

(this was to prevent the layers sagging above the holes).

FT93sider.thumb.jpg.5247094223cb2d50ea2deb285bb59238.jpg[/media]FT93topr.thumb.jpg.10ef019ac473fdad4feac0c743912ba8.jpg[/media]

FT93sider.thumb.jpg.5247094223cb2d50ea2deb285bb59238.jpg

FT93topr.thumb.jpg.10ef019ac473fdad4feac0c743912ba8.jpg

Edited by Guest
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Thanks Labern!

Lowering the temp. to 145 degC did help as far as the holes, and surface texture are concerned.

But I still had to print at a bed temp. of 100 degC, fans off, to make the part stick to the bed.

 

If you enter M302 ( allow cold extrudes command ) into the start of your g code then it will allow you to print at temps lower then 170deg.

 

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Oils do reduce bonding, and wax being oily by nature...

Probably you need more mechanical grip? Maybe blue painter's tape might work? Or any other rough sheets? (Has anyone ever tried a sheet of sandpaper?)

Or maybe you could melt a thin layer of wax or parafine/stearine all over the build plate, and let that cool? I have no idea if it would work, but the parafine/stearine from candles is sometimes very difficult to remove from glass. So it could work? Tea lights usually consist of parafine, very thin birthday candles consist of stearine, and normal candles are a parafine/stearine mix. Stearine has a higher melting point and is harder, as far as I remember.

Edited by Guest

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I've obtained Blue Tape from FormFutura.

I've run the same component with bed temp-100degC and 100% infill

printing on Blue Tape, and it worked...no lifting off the bed!

I've also run the same component at 30% infill using hair spray and did not experience lifting off the bed.

So a summary

nozzle temp =145 degC via gcode=M302

bed temp=100 degC

print speed =20mm/s

no fans until layer 75 then fans=30%

infill=100%

brim

blue tape

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That machinable wax, is that available in 2.85mm filament? Or do you use some feeder/melting pot you designed by yourself on top of the printer head?

If filament, how wel does it transport through the bowden tube and feeder? Thus without breaking, and without grinding?

Such wax might also be very usefull for artists who want to make bronze sculptures in the traditional way by moulding and casting. Instead of making a clay original, they could print it in wax. Or for casting small automotive parts in iron or aluminum, such as model airplane engine parts.

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The machinable wax can be obtained from www.machinablewax.com

It is listed as 3mm (and 1.75mm).

I ordered it not knowing whether it would feed through the bowden tube.

I am happy to report that it did not cause feeding problems (I have an Extended 2+

machine).

I ordered it with the lost wax process in mind.

The biggest problem (with the wax) is making stick to the bed.

Also its very hard to print with support members (because the support members fuse with the part)- I talking about support members that bridge to the outside surface (not support members inside holes).

 

That machinable wax, is that available in 2.85mm filament? Or do you use some feeder/melting pot you designed by yourself on top of the printer head?

If filament, how wel does it transport through the bowden tube and feeder? Thus without breaking, and without grinding?

Such wax might also be very usefull for artists who want to make bronze sculptures in the traditional way by moulding and casting. Instead of making a clay original, they could print it in wax. Or for casting small automotive parts in iron or aluminum, such as model airplane engine parts.

 

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I have obtained some Moldlay (from FormFutura) and given it a try.

170C nozzle, heated bed=35C, blue tape, layer height=0.2mm,

fan=0%, infill=100% nozzle=0.4mm

It printed beautifully with no hint of lifting from the bed, and no warping.

There was no problem with the supports.

This is the way to go...vastly superior to Machinable Wax!

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I tried a print with machinable wax and it came out ........................ different.

5a331f6bb88c4_IMG_7405(1).thumb.JPG.bd16be1d489d7e8311ffcbfedf56655b.JPG[/media]

Wish I'd have come here first, but thought I'd try my own settings. I too couldn't print with it below about 180C so to have that g-code solution is pretty awesome. Although me and g-code don't get on all the time.

Will look in to the m320 as well, thanks a lot.

5a331f6bb88c4_IMG_7405(1).thumb.JPG.bd16be1d489d7e8311ffcbfedf56655b.JPG

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I tried a print with machinable wax and it came out ........................ different.

5a331f6bb88c4_IMG_7405(1).thumb.JPG.bd16be1d489d7e8311ffcbfedf56655b.JPG[/media]

Wish I'd have come here first, but thought I'd try my own settings. I too couldn't print with it below about 180C so to have that g-code solution is pretty awesome. Although me and g-code don't get on all the time.

Will look in to the m320  as well, thanks a lot.

40*C is a big difference!  

142*C is the sweet spot for my machine with this material.  Did you ever get the M302 G-Code to work for you?

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