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Material surrounding heater block and nozzle


Indatrees

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Posted (edited) · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

Hello,

My print failed while I was away.  I think it had been building this blob of PLA on top of the nozzle and around the heater wires for an hour or so.  How can I fix this?!?

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Edited by Guest
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    Posted · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    This happens once in a while. Don't panic! :D. Just heat up the nozzle to around 90-100 and let it sit for a few minutes. Once the PLA is soft-ish, just pull it away with pliers, it should come off clean (on occasion cleaner than before) If it's too hard increase the temperature a little bit, but once you get near the nozzle, drop it back down to 90. Any higher and you will get a mess.

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    Posted · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    When it is clean again you may want to check if the heater cartridge and the temperature sensor are still sitting properly inside the heater block.

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    Posted (edited) · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    This is the disadvantage of using the spacer which is now stock, instead of the spring which was the tradition. It is the part pressing the teflon down.

    If the steel coupler surrounding the teflon is not adjusted to make the pressure , then you get this leak. Before UM2+, in the time of UM2, this was a more uncommon problem, since the spring would always make at least SOME pressure.  

    The advantage of the spacer, "korneel spacer, several variants", is that with a correctly adjusted steel coupler you can have greater pressure than with the spring, and have even less risk of leak!

    What do you think @Dim3nsioneer?

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    Posted · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    After you get it off (you know you can just leave it on there right?) heat up to 150C and turn that round steel nut raising the block up into the head and lifting the white teflon part into the aluminum cylinder which will tighten things up a bit. In fact check how loose the aluminum is and rotate until it is no longer loose and then add another 1/4 turn.

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    Posted · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    1/4 turn = 0.1875 mm, ( only) : try even 1/2 turn extra.. More turns= higher pressure= less leaks= less life of Teflon. With the Bondtech feeder (now increasingly popular, and I have visited the guy in Sweden, and take it from me, he has quite a set-up! Top engineering!),- with it you have even more pressure. There are reports of Bowdens popping out (something has to give when you increase speed), teflons leaking, nozzles leaking..

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    Posted · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    After you get it off (you know you can just leave it on there right?) heat up to 150C and turn that round steel nut raising the block up into the head and lifting the white teflon part into the aluminum cylinder which will tighten things up a bit.  In fact check how loose the aluminum is and rotate until it is no longer loose and then add another 1/4 turn.

     

    I know that put if he has disassembled it. These things happen.

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    Posted · Material surrounding heater block and nozzle

    This is the disadvantage of using the spacer which is now stock, instead of the spring which was the tradition. It is the part pressing the teflon down.

    If the steel coupler surrounding the teflon is not adjusted to make the pressure , then you get this leak. Before UM2+, in the time of UM2, this was a more uncommon problem, since the spring would always make at least SOME pressure.  

    The advantage of the spacer, "korneel spacer, several variants", is that with a correctly adjusted steel coupler you can have greater pressure than with the spring, and have even less risk of leak!

    What do you think @Dim3nsioneer?

     

    Well, people like me who have two hotends (not necessarily for dual extrusion but as in my case for different filament diameters) use the steel coupler to adjust the height of the nozzle(s). An adjustable spacer as the one from @anders-olsson then helps to get a reasonable pressure onto each hotend. Personally, I like the spring and kept it for one hotend.

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