Jump to content
Ultimaker Community of 3D Printing Experts
Sign in to follow this  
thomix

Dual extruder on Ultimaker?

Recommended Posts

Makerbot Industries just released their new 3d printer which allows a dual extruder head. Dual color printing (or even dual material) is the future! Triple color coming right after, of course.

Did anyone try something like that with an ultimaker? It seems to me that due to the separate extruder and the bowden cable there are hardly any space constraints in the print head and it should be easy to fit a second bowden cable/nozzle. The second extruder could be placed anywhere and IIRC the electronics already has a 5th unused stepper motor output. My feeling is that it can't be hard, but I am still waiting for my ultimaker so I cannot start fiddling yet :)

Any thoughts on this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I haven't seen too much talk of it in this forum if you google the topic you'll probably get tossed over to the google discussion group. Though I don't think much has been said about it lately, I could be mistaken.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said on the google group, the Ultimaker has an option for Dual Extrusion (as did the BfB), so its not something new. The "dual extrusion" option is something extra that you can put on the ultimaker, however the software doesnt support dual extrusion at this moment.

It is possible, you just need to adjust some values in the firmware & create custom G-code, and you can do dual extrusion. The ultimaker is designed with dual extrusion in mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I realised that the Ultimaker already has the holes for a second hot-end as well as for a second feeder, it also has the wires and terminals ready. So, one year later, what about the software, can Cura do it ? what about netfabb ?

And is there a guide on how to add a second extruder ?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cura already does some dual-extrusion for almost a year now. (well hidden, not bothering you with it unless you need it)

However, dual-extrusion has a heap of problems. Even after a year, see how little dual extrusion models and prints you can find. There is a reason for this, and that's the oozing problem that nobody solved properly yet.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi corngolem,

It's not that the oozing only appears with 2 hot ends, it also occurs with only 1. You obviously noticed this just before or after a print. The plastic leaks out of the hot end. So, when printing with one hot end, the other hot end starts oozing and so ruining your print.

As far as I know, the oozing problem is 'solved' by adding a cold-zone above the hot end and the filament is retracted into the cold zone. There it solidifies and prevents oozing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you can only retract the solid part of the filament and, for the first few seconds, the molten filament will also be retracted due to adhesion. But a (big) piece of the molten filament (especially the part closest to the nozzle) will come loose from the solid filament and starts to drip/ooze out of the nozzle. You can easily try this by slowly retracting the filament by hand without printing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Our picks

    • How to 3D print with reinforced engineering materials
      Ultimaker is hosting a webinar where we explain how you can achieve and maintain a high print success rate using these new reinforced engineering materials. Learn from Ultimaker's Product Manager of Materials and top chemical engineer Bart van As how you can take your 3D printing to that next level.
      • 2 replies
    • "Back To The Future" using Generative Design & Investment Casting
      Designing for light-weight parts is becoming more important, and I’m a firm believer in the need to produce lighter weight, less over-engineered parts for the future. This is for sustainability reasons because we need to be using less raw materials and, in things like transportation, it impacts the energy usage of the product during it’s service life.
        • Like
      • 12 replies
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Ultimaker Community of 3D printing experts. Visit the following links to read more about our Terms of Use or our Privacy Policy. Thank you!