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Alkalbani

Advice 3D Solex Hard Core EHT please

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I don't know how to go above 350C. Right now jedi marlin runs on the board that controls the temperature and it goes above 355C it will shut down the print job. So as a minimum jedi marlin needs to be edited and built. I think I can handle that as I've built regular marlin before but then I have no idea how to get that installed on that circuit board.

Then also I believe you have to change some limits in jedi (I assume - possibly not mandatory). This is probably easier as it's all python I think. So you just edit it directly.

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I was planning to research this but... I have 8 other things I'm planning to do and the weekend is almost over. Keep bugging me about this or maybe if you are comfortable with changing software I can help you out and we can do this together.

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haven't gotten the printcore yet, i hope to first test it with ABS, then PC.

But i want to find a way to change the max temp in the printer.

Also you can change nozzles on this model, so i can hopefully choose the nozzles i want for the print job, instead of having multiple printcores for each nozzle size.

 

Hi Alkabani,

Did you try to print PLA, ABS, Polycarbonate with the EHT core ?

 

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haven't gotten the printcore yet, i hope to first test it with ABS, then PC.

But i want to find a way to change the max temp in the printer.

Also you can change nozzles on this model, so i can hopefully choose the nozzles i want for the print job, instead of having multiple printcores for each nozzle size.

 

Hi Alkabani,

Did you try to print PLA, ABS, Polycarbonate with the EHT core ?

 

 

Dunno, and probably @ultiarjan knows more, but if you change nozzles I bet you might need to recalibrate x/y/z (that's 20mins procedure). But I could be wrong.

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haven't gotten the printcore yet, i hope to first test it with ABS, then PC.

But i want to find a way to change the max temp in the printer.

Also you can change nozzles on this model, so i can hopefully choose the nozzles i want for the print job, instead of having multiple printcores for each nozzle size.

 

Hi Alkabani,

Did you try to print PLA, ABS, Polycarbonate with the EHT core ?

 

 

Dunno, and probably @ultiarjan knows more, but if you change nozzles I bet you might need to recalibrate x/y/z (that's 20mins procedure). But I could be wrong.

 

Z for sure, XY probably not, but changing nozzles is more time consuming vs changing a core, since I would always do it heated, I would try to stick to using the same nozzle on a hardcore, f.e. a 0.6 on a hardcore and 0.4 on UM core. Also because you want to make sure the hardcore is not leaking.

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if the printcores are manufactored properly and have the same depth. then they should have the same z calibration.

so no need to do a 2nd calibration.

but i suppose better be safe than sorry.

 

 

 

haven't gotten the printcore yet, i hope to first test it with ABS, then PC.

But i want to find a way to change the max temp in the printer.

Also you can change nozzles on this model, so i can hopefully choose the nozzles i want for the print job, instead of having multiple printcores for each nozzle size.

 

Hi Alkabani,

Did you try to print PLA, ABS, Polycarbonate with the EHT core ?

 

 

Dunno, and probably @ultiarjan knows more, but if you change nozzles I bet you might need to recalibrate x/y/z (that's 20mins procedure). But I could be wrong.

 

Z for sure, XY probably not, but changing nozzles is more time consuming vs changing a core, since I would always do it heated, I would try to stick to using the same nozzle on a hardcore, f.e. a 0.6 on a hardcore and 0.4 on UM core. Also because you want to make sure the hardcore is not leaking.

 

Edited by Guest

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There's differences from one core to another. I have 4 and every single one has a different calibration. The good thing is that the firmware remembers the serial number and writes the x/y/z after calibrating it.

So when you change a nozzle, if the calibration changes, you will need to redo the process each time. Unless ofc ou don't mind having a slightly off x/y/z...

So yeah, that's the good thing of using cores, it makes all faster.

But also, UM clearly is so focused on highend customers that want a plug/print solution, that they don't release all nozzle sizes without making cura profiles for their tag filaments. Big companies don't mind paying for cores to avoid manual repairs or recalibration.

On the other side, companies like bcn3d have released a interesting tool to make profiles for all their new hotends, so you choose the combination and they generate a profile for your material and nozzle size, very interesting path. Ofc, that's not what a big company wants, but an user like me find it very attractive.

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If you just change the nozzle it shouldn't change the calibration but it might. If you get a little stuff in the threads for example. The nozzles are about .01mm the same. In other words the .25 and the .8mm nozzles are the same length. Not enough to be calibrated out.

But 2 printcores could easily be .1mm different so you definitely want to calibrate at least once in X,Y,Z.

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well i checked my normal HardCore nozzles dimentions with a micrometer, and they were actually very accurate (for the whole body, and the tip only).

The max error i found was about 0.03mm that is 30 microns.

I just tested doing a fast print with a 0.4mm nozzle today, and then i changed the nozzle to the 0.6mm, and started another print without a calibration, and it printed fine. So the previous calibration was okay after the nozzle change....(don't forget to change the nozzle settings in simplify3d)

But i agree with gr5, that is be careful that you don't cross-thread the nozzles, or if you don't fully fasten them in. And logically you won't need a calibration until you have a wornout nozzle.

And again i also agree with Neotko as well regarding the beauty of changing print cores quickly. But for me i want to buildup a nozzle collection of (1xHardcore multi noozle for all normal jobs), (1xEHT Hardcore again multi nozzle for special filaments that require very high heat and can be abrasive). These two will replace my current two AA cores. Which reduces the number of printcores i need to only two, to cover most of my printing habbits. As for the BB core, i might modify that aswell when it gets wornout, to make it nozzle swappable, but only to change the nozzle to another the same size so i don't need to replace the whole printcore after it gets clogged or fully wornout.

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