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Jesse Marcel

Ulti 3 extended feeder issues

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On the Ultimaker 3 (extended version) I find it difficult to load the filament into the feeder.  Unless I lift up on the pressure control mechanism and push the filament up into feeder, the filament will simply not load.  I spend the better part of 10 - 15 minutes getting the material loaded every time.  Often the filament will get hung up on the lower edge of the mechanism that holds the bowden tube in place.  Sometimes I have to turn the armature of the stepper motor to get the filament into the bowden tube.

 

I am reluctant in lowering the tension as the filament looks like its knurled similar to photos in the manual..   

 

This is my first 3d printer, and other than the feeder issue, the printer is nearly flawless.  I have been able to print extremely complex parts with perfection.... over and over....

 

 

 

 

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I had to get used to this system too. But once you get the hang of it, it's pretty easy. The only thing I haven't gotten used to is the fact that the spools are on the back of the printer, so I now have my printer with the side facing forward on the desk.

 

* Make sure that the filament is as straight as possible. Sometimes it can be pretty curled, especially the last part of a spool.

* I lift the tensioner with my thumb or index finger (pull the white knob upwards)

* Push in the filament until you feel the wheel is gripping it (no force is needed for this, just move it upwards)

* Release the tensioner

 

After some practice this takes me at most a minute

Edited by pbackx
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15 hours ago, Jesse Marcel said:

lift up on the pressure control mechanism and push the filament up into feeder

That is how it is designed to be operated.

To make things easier, definitely make the leading edge as straight as possible. Also, try to make sure there are no overhangs or other issues with the end. You can cut on a bias (Not square to the length of filament) or, @tinkergnome told me a cool thing you can do, which is heat the end a bit and pull until you get a nice center taper and just snip the very end off and it will feed into the mechanism much easier.

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2 hours ago, kmanstudios said:

a cool thing you can do, which is heat the end a bit and pull until you get a nice center taper and just snip the very end off and it will feed into the mechanism much easier.

 

That was not me who told this to you, but it sounds like a good idea :+1:

A straight first piece of filament and a chamfered tip is usually sufficient for me, no need to lift the lever.

The stepper motor has to be moving of course - @Jesse Marcel it sounds like you are not using the material load / change "wizard" from the printers menu - for any special reason?

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2 hours ago, tinkergnome said:

That was not me who told this to you, but it sounds like a good idea

Hmmmm....I wonder who it was...it was a good suggestion. I do not use the method you just described with the stepper motors running either though.....

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7 hours ago, kmanstudios said:

That is how it is designed to be operated.

To make things easier, definitely make the leading edge as straight as possible. Also, try to make sure there are no overhangs or other issues with the end. You can cut on a bias (Not square to the length of filament) or, @tinkergnome told me a cool thing you can do, which is heat the end a bit and pull until you get a nice center taper and just snip the very end off and it will feed into the mechanism much easier.

Thank you, I am going to give this a shot

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8 hours ago, pbackx said:

I had to get used to this system too. But once you get the hang of it, it's pretty easy. The only thing I haven't gotten used to is the fact that the spools are on the back of the printer, so I now have my printer with the side facing forward on the desk.

 

* Make sure that the filament is as straight as possible. Sometimes it can be pretty curled, especially the last part of a spool.

* I lift the tensioner with my thumb or index finger (pull the white knob upwards)

* Push in the filament until you feel the wheel is gripping it (no force is needed for this, just move it upwards)

* Release the tensioner

 

After some practice this takes me at most a minute

I think you hit on my issue, I might be loading the filament to early in the process....

 

I agree, getting access to the back of the machine can be cumbersome I ended up using a cart on rollers and it has helped immensely

 

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